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LIST OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION 6††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††

SECTION A†††††††††††††††† BIOGRAPHICAL, A.1-A.210 4†††††††††††††††††††††

SECTION B†††††††††††††††† RADAR, B.1-B.57 4††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††

SECTION C†††††††††††††††† JODRELL BANK, C.1-C.13 4†††††††††††††††††††††††

SECTION D†††††††††††††††† AUSTRALIA, D.1-D.43 4†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††

SECTION E†††††††††††††††† RESEARCH FILES, E.1-E.131 4†††††††††††††††††††

SECTION F†††††††††††††††† PUBLICATIONS, LECTURES AND BROADCASTS, F.1-F.217 4†††

SECTION G†††††††††††††††† SOCIETIES AND ORGANISATIONS, G.1-G.12 4

SECTION H†††††††††††††††† CORRESPONDENCE, H.1-H.82 4

SECTION J††††††††††††††††† NON-TEXTUAL MEDIA, J.1-J.103 4

 

INTRODUCTION

COLLECTION LEVEL INFORMATION 6

OUTLINE OF THE LIFE AND CAREER OF ROBERT HANBURY BROWN 6

DESCRIPTION OF THE COLLECTION 6

LOCATIONS OF OTHER MATERIAL 6

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

 

COLLECTION LEVEL INFORMATION

 

Title:†††††††††††††††††††††††††††† Catalogue of the papers and correspondence of Robert Hanbury Brown AC FRS FAAS (1916-2002), astronomer

 

Compiled by:†††††††††††††††† Anna-K. Mayer and Timothy E. Powell

 

Date of material:††††††††††† 1911-2007

 

Extent of material:††††††††† ca 870 items

 

Deposited in:†††††††††††††††† Royal Society, London

 

Reference:†††††††††††††††††††† GB 0117 RHB

 

2007 National Cataloguing Unit for the Archives of Contemporary Scientists, University of Bath

NCUACS catalogue no. 151/1/07

5

 

 

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION

PROVENANCE

The papers were received from Dr Marion Hanbury Brown, daughter of Robert Hanbury Brown, in August 2003 and August 2006.

OUTLINE OF THE CAREER OF ROBERT HANBURY BROWN

Robert Hanbury Brown was born on 31 August 1916 in Aruvankadu, South India, where his father was in charge of a cordite factory. He was sent to England to be educated and attended Cottesmore Preparatory School in Hove, Sussex, from the age of eight to fourteen. In 1930 he entered Tonbridge School in Kent, switching to Brighton Technical College after only two years. The decision was partly the product of strained family finances – his parents had divorced when he was about nine and in 1932 his stepfather disappeared in a cloud of debt – but Hanbury Brown had long shown an active interest in technological matters. His grandfather (the irrigation engineer Sir Robert Hanbury Brown) was one of the early pioneers of radio, and his legal guardian after his parents’ divorce was a consulting radio engineer. Hanbury Brown remembered his childhood as a happy time spent ‘always making radio sets or building something’ (Interview with R. Bhathal, 10 February 1995. See A.30).

At Brighton Technical College he studied for an external degree in the University of London, graduating B.Sc. with first class honours in electrical engineering at the age of nineteen. At this time appeared also his first publication (with his student friend Vic Tyler), on ‘Lamp polar curves on the cathode-ray oscillograph’. With a grant from East Sussex County Council he then embarked on a postgraduate course in advanced studies on telegraphy and telephony at City & Guilds of London Institute, then part of Imperial College. At the time he hoped to complete a doctorate in radio engineering and to pursue a career that would combine his interest in radio with flying, for which he had developed a yen.

Hanbury Brown’s involvement both with the new University of London Air Squadron and with cathode-ray tubes drew the interest of the Rector of Imperial College, Henry Tizard. Tizard chaired a committee that had recently been set up by the Air Ministry to find ways of protecting Britain from possible attack from enemy aircraft. Through Tizard’s intervention Hanbury Brown came to be recruited into an experimental project instigated by Robert Watson-Watt, to develop a system of radio-location using pulse/echo technique for aircraft detection. In August 1936 Hanbury Brown joined what would grow into the Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE) and helped develop Chain Home, an air surveillance system of ground stations along the East and South Coasts that proved vital in the 1940 Battle of Britain. From the autumn of 1937 he worked in the airborne radar group under E. G. Bowen, which transferred to the USA in 1942 for a joint British-American mission on air defence. Returning three years later he rejoined TRE, helping the Air Historical Branch of the Air Ministry write an account of airborne radar and working on the application of the pulsed navigational aid GEE to civil aviation. A research consultancy set up by Watson-Watt in 1947 offered more interesting prospects for the conversion of wartime developments into peacetime technologies. Hanbury Brown allowed himself to be recruited and worked as a consulting engineer until Watson-Watt decided to move the firm to Canada. After pondering a number of career possibilities, he returned to academia in the autumn of 1949, when he started as a Ph.D. student in radio astronomy at the University of Manchester.

It has been said that the story of radio astronomy effectively began with the return of physicists from wartime radar development and ‘with their eagerness and ability to follow up certain discoveries made accidentally in a military context’ (D. Edge and M. Mulkay, Astronomy Transformed. The Emergence of Radio Astronomy in Britain (John Wiley, 1976), ix). Hanbury Brown very much exemplifies this story – though as an engineer as much as a physicist. His impact at Jodrell Bank, where Manchester’s radio astronomy group was based, was instantaneous. The development for which he achieved his greatest distinction lay in interferometry, indeed in showing how the principle of the intensity interferometer could be applied to optical interferometry. In 1956, he and the mathematician R.Q. Twiss showed on the basis of a laboratory experiment that the time of arrival of photons at two separate detectors was correlated (Hanbury Brown-Twiss effect). Physicists struggled with the idea, photon correlation being inconceivable from a quantum theoretical perspective; yet Hanbury Brown and Twiss proceeded to demonstrate on the example of the star Sirius how the phenomenon could be used in an interferometer to measure the apparent angular diameter of bright visual stars. Their work earned them a Michelson Medal for opening up the subject of quantum optics.

With the controversy over the Hanbury Brown-Twiss effect in full swing, Hanbury Brown proposed a large optical interferometer to measure the diameters of other main sequence stars. The Department of Scientific and Industrial Research agreed to fund the initial design costs and a large part of the eventual construction costs for an instrument consisting of two reflectors, mounted on a circular railway track 188 metres in diameter. The instrument was manufactured in Britain and Italy, but built in the Australian bush near Narrabri in New South Wales. The construction of the Narrabri Stellar Intensity Interferometer (NSII) at a fairly remote site was a heroic task, which kept Hanbury Brown full-time in Australia. In 1964, two years into the mission, he resigned from the personal chair which the University of Manchester had created for him in 1960, and accepted an appointment as Professor of Physics (Astronomy) at the University of Sydney. Despite tempting offers to go elsewhere after the NSII was decommissioned in 1974, he stayed on to explore a next generation instrument. This was not to be another intensity interferometer as initially envisaged, but a modernised Michelson interferometer. As Hanbury Brown himself was keen to emphasize, the development of this technically demanding instrument, the Sydney University Stellar Interferometer (SUSI), became the project of his colleague John Davis. It took almost twenty years to design the SUSI and to ensure that it was built. The SUSI opened in 1991, ten years after Hanbury Brown officially retired.

Hanbury Brown’s commitments to science manifested beyond the instruments and institutions with which he was most visibly affiliated. His involvements in such ventures of the 1970s as the Anglo-Australian-Telescope (AAT) or the Science Task Force both illustrate in their way how he envisaged future science. For instance, he used a job interview for the directorship of the new AAT to criticize centralist tendencies in Australian science funding, pleading for greater equality of the state universities vis-ŗ-vis the flagship of Australian academia, the Australian National University. Likewise, as a member of the Science Task Force, a consultative committee of the Royal Commission on Australian Government Administration, he expressed his concerns over changes in the scientific ethos under government funding, which had become the norm after World War II. The now classic report of the Task Force, Towards Diversity and Adaptability (1975), was imbued with the ideal of scientific autonomy.

Over the years Hanbury Brown developed his dimension as a public scientist also in his writings and his lectures. He became an interpreter of science who explained to non-expert audiences his particular science, interferometry, as well as his views on the scientific enterprise more broadly. His broadcasts and other public performances bear this out, as do such monographs as his account of The Intensity Interferometer (1974) or the more philosophical Man and the Stars (1978) and The Wisdom of Science (1986). In his last publication, There are no Dinosaurs in the Bible, which he had written for his grandchildren and which appeared posthumously, he returned to a theme that had occupied him over a number of decades, the relations between science and religion. Another subject close to his heart was his wartime experiences. Hanbury Brown’s friendships from the radar days lasted a lifetime, and he continued to explore the history of radar with younger radar buffs, through reunions and celebratory occasions, in television programmes and sound recordings, and in his autobiography, Boffin: A Personal Story of the Early Days of Radar, Radio Astronomy and Quantum Optics (1991). Indeed, he was rumoured to have been the prototype prompting the expression ‘boffin’ (for a technological expert).

Hanbury Brown accumulated many honours during his long career. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1960 and a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science in 1967. In 1986, he was made a Companion of the Order of Australia.He married Hilda Heather Chesterman in 1952. They had one daughter and two sons (twins). He died on 16 January 2002.

DESCRIPTION OF THE COLLECTION

Although there is significant material from Hanbury Brown’s education and early career, including wartime service, the bulk of this archive dates from the 1960s to the late 1990s and there is thus a pronounced emphasis on Hanbury Brown’s career following his departure for Australia. His war-time research, the transition to radio astronomy and the intense collaborations in the Jodrell Bank group are more sketchily documented, as is in fact his and John Davis’s quest for an instrument to succeed the NSII.

Section A, Biographical, presents a wide range of material relating to Hanbury Brown’s life and career. It includes the contents of a boxfile of biographical correspondence from the 1930s and 1940s documenting his education, wartime service and immediate postwar career. There are transcripts of interviews, proceedings of conferences to honour his achievements, and drafts (with correspondence) of his Royal Society/Australian Academy of Science Biographical Memoir and other tributes and obituaries. The section includes family material, including letters to his wife Heather before and after their marriage, certificates of education and of awards, and a series of diaries 1936-1998. There is also photographic material.

Section B, Radar, documents aspects of Hanbury Brown’s war work from early experiments at Martlesham airfield in Suffolk to memorabilia (including a poem on the ‘radar man’). His time with the Combined Research Group at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, DC, USA, is covered by memoranda and photostats of research reports. Of particular interest is the material relating to the claim on the part of the airborne radar team for an award for the design and development of metre-wave airborne radar. This section further includes reunion activities in the 1990s.

Section C, Jodrell Bank, is the smallest section. It contains an early letter to J. A. Ratcliffe in which Hanbury Brown outlined a radio interferometer of high resolution, pen-recorded inscriptions of signals from Cassiopeia and Sirius, and a notebook with measurements on Sirius that provided practical vindication of the Hanbury Brown-Twiss effect. There are memoranda and proposals on instruments, notably the steerable radio telescope and the interferometer that was eventually built in Narrabri. The development of this latter instrument is further documented by a notebook containing detailed calculations and tests of sample equipment for the future NSII. A number of photographs show various Jodrell Bank individuals and apparatus.

Section D, Australia, essentially covers three astronomical instruments and their genesis. Correspondence, notebooks, photographs and promotional materials document the NSII. The story of the successor instrument, the SUSI, is represented chiefly by photographs of an early model showing a Very Large Stellar Intensity Interferometer, a subsequent proposal of a Michelson interferometer, and discussions between Hanbury Brown and John Davis. There is also correspondence re the AAT and the future of science and engineering in the University of Sydney.

Section E, Research Files, the second-largest section, contains research materials which Hanbury Brown accumulated over many decades. These files testify to three foci of enduring interest on his part, (a) the story of radar, (b) radio astronomy, and (c) reflections about science. The history of radar is documented by original documents and pamphlets, correspondence with both fellow radar pioneers and younger radar buffs, memoirs, and drafts of equipment biographies. The subsection on radio astronomy includes literature on various types of interferometers and on quantum theory, correspondence and draft publications on the behaviour of photons (these from the time of the controversy over the Hanbury Brown-Twiss effect), and a special section on his ‘dear friend Sirius’ (Letter to J. M. Bennett, 1 June 1994, H.31). A subsection is dedicated to historical topics in radio astronomy. Material on reflections about science consists of his notes on science-historical literature; correspondence, notes and literature on science’s relations with religion; and general articles.

Section F, Publications and Lectures, is the largest component of this collection. It documents some of Hanbury Brown’s publications, including offprints, books, reviews and newspaper articles, starting with his 1935 publication on the cathode-ray oscillograph. The lectures portion presents drafts, outlines and index card notes for many of Hanbury Brown’s speaking engagements over almost five decades, including his broadcasts. This material is qualitatively heterogeneous, ranging from expert conference papers to light-hearted dinner toasts. Sound and video recordings of some of these can be found in Section J.

Section G, Societies and Organisations, is another short section. It documents a few of Hanbury Brown’s involvements with a variety of bodies from the National Centre for Basic Sciences in Calcutta, India, to the Astronomical Society of Australia. There is correspondence with the Royal Society and with the Institution of Electrical Engineers. Material includes copies of reports (co-authored by Hanbury Brown) to the International Scientific Radio Union (URSI) and to the Royal Commission on Australian Government Administration.

Section H, Correspondence, presents several series of correspondence which together span seven decades. There are three alphabetical sequences, one dating from the 1940s to the early 1950s, the second consisting of named correspondents, the third dating chiefly from the 1980s and 1990s (with a few earlier letters). The first sequence includes family letters and correspondence about the Sir Robert Watson-Watt & Partners consultancy. Hanbury Brown’s named correspondents in the second sequence are colleagues and friends from the days of radar and early radio astronomy, and his colleague John Davis. The third sequence ranges over a multitude of correspondents and topics. It reflects chiefly Hanbury Brown’s activities after his return from Australia in 1991. This section closes with a notebook listing all the letters Hanbury Brown sent between 1990 and 1996.

Section J, Non-textual media, spans audiotapes, videotapes, other visual material, and computer disks. The audiotapes date from 1973 to 1999 and include recordings of Hanbury Brown’s wife Heather. Videotapes are principally of Hanbury Brown’s contributions to television documentaries and interviews on his wartime work. The visual material includes an extensive slide collection, which appears to have served him as a store on which to draw for his lecturing activities. The computer disks reflect both Hanbury Brown’s changing word processing equipment and his diverse activities, from his writings to his correspondence with colleagues, friends, institutions, businesses and so forth. Not all of these disks have been deciphered at this stage of processing.

5

 

LOCATION OF FURTHER MATERIAL

A substantial portion of Hanbury Brown’s personal archive was destroyed in 1961 owing to a misunderstanding (Letter to J. P. Wild, 16 January 1974, H.127). Some material relating to his Jodrell Bank period can be found in the papers of A. C. B. Lovell in the Jodrell Bank Archive at the John Rylands University Library of the University of Manchester. Hanbury Brown left many of the documents relating to his work in astronomy in Australia to the University of Sydney, where he thought they belonged. These are in the University Archives of the University of Sydney and include correspondence regarding the intensity interferometer at Narrabri, technical papers, funding and general correspondence, 1957-1983. There is also correspondence on the AAT, 1967-1974, and an audio tape interview on his retirement in 1981. Further material, notably 27 scrapbooks compiled by Hanbury Brown’s wife Heather, is in the hands of the family. It is anticipated that they will be deposited at the Royal Society to join this collection in due course.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

We are grateful to Dr Marion Hanbury Brown for making the papers available and for information on family history, and to Professor John Davis for information and advice especially on Section D.Dr Ragbir Bhathal kindly arranged for a missing copy of his interview with Hanbury Brown to be made available from the Oral History Collection in the National Library of Australia. Lastly, we owe a debt of gratitude to Dr Jeremy John, Curator of Digital Manuscripts at the British Library, for his expertise with computer disks in Section J.

 

Anna-K. Mayer

Bath, 2007

 

5

 

 

SECTION A

BIOGRAPHICAL, A.1-A.210

 

 

1911-2005

A.1-A.34†††††††††† BIOGRAPHICAL AND AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL

 

A.35-A.46††††††††† EDUCATION

 

A.47-A.68††††††††† CAREER, HONOURS AND AWARDS

 

A.69-A.84††††††††† BIOGRAPHICAL CORRESPONDENCE

 

A.85-A.89††††††††† COMMEMORATIVE OCCASIONS

 

A.90-A.148††††††† DIARIES

 

A.149-A.165††††† DOCUMENTS AND LICENCES

 

A.166-A.178††††† PERSONAL FILE

 

A.179-A.200††††† FAMILY

 

A.201-A.207††††† PHOTOGRAPHS

 

A.208-A.210††††† MISCELLANEOUS

 

 

A.1-A.34

BIOGRAPHICAL AND AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL

 

 

 

1972-2005, n.d.

A.1, A.2

Obituaries

 

 

Hanbury Brown died on 16 January 2002 at the Countess of Brecknock Hospice, Andover, Hampshire.

 

 

2002-2003

A.1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 2002

 

Guardian, 18 January 2002.

 

Independent, 19 January 2002.

 

Announcement of funeral service, The Times, 19 January 2002.

 

Daily Telegraph, 22 January 2002; with a letter to the editor from R. Trim, 29 January 2002.

 

The Times, 24 January 2002.

 

Australian, 25 January 2002.

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 30 January 2002.

 

Draft of an obituary by A. Boksenberg, 20 January 2002.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A.2

February 2002-February 2003

 

New York Times, 7 February 2002.

 

Nature, 7 March 2002; with correspondence re Hanbury Brown’s portrait, 1 March 2002.

 

Australian Academy of Science Newsletter, December 2001-March 2002.

 

Australian Telescope National Facility News, June 2002.

 

Physics Today, July 2002.

 

Current Science, 10 September 2002.

 

Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, February 2003.

 

 

 

 

A.3-A.17

Letters of condolence

 

 

2002

A.3, A.4

Family

 

 

2002

A.3

Identified

 

 

 

 

A.4

Unidentified

 

 

 

 

A.5, A.6

Official

 

 

2002

A.5

A-L

 

 

 

 

A.6

M-W

 

 

 

 

A.7-A.9

Friends

 

 

2002

A.7

Identified

 

 

 

 

A.8, A.9

 

Unidentified

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

 

A.10-A.13

Australia

 

 

2002

A.10

A-G

 

 

 

 

A.11

H-T

 

 

 

 

A.12, A.13

Unidentified

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

 

A.14

Radar connections

 

 

 

2002

A.15-A.17

Locals

 

 

2002

A.15

Identified

 

 

 

 

A.16, A.17

Unidentified

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

 

A.18

Funeral

 

 

Includes a list of family and friends who attended Hanbury Brown’s funeral, lists of apologies received and of people who received the service sheets, and a copy of the Order of Service.

 

Hanbury Brown’s funeral service took place on 25 January 2002 in the parish church of Penton Mewsey, Hampshire.

 

 

 

2002

A.19-A.25

Biographical Memoir

 

 

Hanbury Brown’s Royal Society Biographical Memoir was co-authored by A.C.B. Lovell, who wrote the first part and the ‘end-piece’, and J. Davis, who was responsible for the Australian portion of Hanbury Brown’s life. In this joint effort they drew on family knowledge (Hanbury Brown’s wife Heather and his brother Hassall) and Hanbury Brown’s interview with H. de Berg of 1972 (see A.28, A.29). The Memoir was published in Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society vol. 49 (2003), 83-106, and in Historical Records of Australian Science vol. 14 (2003), 459-483.

 

See also A.171.

 

 

2002-2003

 

A.19

February-October 2002

 

Correspondence re Hanbury Brown’s Biographical Memoir.

 

 

 

 

A.20

19 December 2002

 

A. C. B. Lovell’s draft of his part of Hanbury Brown’s Biographical Memoir with a covering letter.

 

 

 

 

A.21

8 January-10 February 2003

 

Correspondence re Hanbury Brown’s childhood, family circumstances, education and war-time experiences. Also includes correspondence re a suitable portrait of Hanbury Brown.

 

 

 

 

A.22

12 February-11 March 2003

 

Includes correspondence re J. Davis’s portion of the Biographical Memoir and further corrections of A. C. B. Lovell’s part.

 

 

 

 

A.23

3 April 2003

 

A final draft of Hanbury Brown’s Biographical Memoir with a covering letter from J. Davis.

 

 

 

 

A.24

6 April 2003

 

H. H. Brown’s comments on J. Davis’s final draft of Brown’s Biographical Memoir.

 

H. H. Brown was Hanbury Brown’s wife.

 

 

 

 

A.25

Offprints

 

 

 

 

A.26-A.32

 

Autobiographical

 

 

Includes interviews.

 

For further conversations and autobiographical accounts, see F.177, F.178, J.17, J.20-J.22, J.26, J.27 and J.29.

 

 

1972-1996, n.d.

A.26

Curriculum vitae and biographical summary

 

 

 

1993, n.d.

A.27

Entries in biographical dictionaries

 

 

 

1996, n.d.

A.28-A.31

Interviews

 

 

1972, 1976, 1994-1995

A.28, A.29

H. de Berg

 

Two slightly different transcripts of an interview with H. de Berg, 24 February 1972. Further includes correspondence.

 

2 folders.

 

1972, 1976

A.30, A.31

R. Bhathal

 

Transcript of a recording of Hanbury Brown in conversation with R. Bhathal, with correspondence.

 

2 folders.

 

The interview forms part of the Dr Ragbir Bhathal Collection in the National Library of Australia.

 

 

 

1994-1995

A.32

Exercise book

 

Used from the front for a chronology of the stellar intensity interferometer with whose conception and construction Hanbury Brown was famously associated. Used from the back for a summary of Hanbury Brown’s visits, committee memberships, etc., 1962-1985.

 

 

 

c.1985, n.d.

A.33, A.34

Posthumous tributes and associated material

 

 

 

2002, 2004-2005

A.33

Posthumous tributes

 

Includes pages from K. A. Wood’s autobiography, Echoes and Reflections (London, 2004).

 

 

 

2004-2005

A.34

Hanbury Brown Papers

 

Correspondence re Hanbury Brown’s papers.

 

 

 

 

2002

A.35-A.46

EDUCATION

 

 

 

Chiefly certificates. See also A.75, A.179.

 

 

 

1931-1960, n.d.

A.35

Cottesmore School

 

 

Photocopies from the Cottesmorian.

 

Hanbury Brown attended Cottesmore School in Hove, Sussex, from the age of eight to fourteen.

 

 

n.d.

A.36

Tonbridge School

 

 

School Certificate B, confirming that Hanbury Brown passed the Oxford and Cambridge School Certificate Examination in English, History, Latin, French, Elementary Mathematics and General Science.

 

 

 

1931

A.37-A.43

Brighton Technical College

 

 

Certificates from the University of London, where Hanbury Brown was registered as an external student while studying at Brighton Technical College.

 

 

1932-1935

A.37

Exemption from matriculation examination

 

Certificate from the University of London, 14 October 1932, confirming that Hanbury Brown was granted exemption from the matriculation examination.

 

 

 

1932

A.38

Intermediate examination

 

Certificate from the University of London, confirming that Hanbury Brown passed the Intermediate Examination in engineering, 25 October 1933.

 

 

 

1933

A.39-A.42

City and Guilds

 

Full Technological Certificates from the City & Guilds of London Institute.

 

 

1934, 1935

A.39, A.40

‘Electrical Engineering Practice (“Distribution”)’

 

Two certificates, one of them wallet-size, confirming that Hanbury Brown passed the final examination in ‘Electrical Engineering Practice (“Distribution”)’.

 

 

 

1934

A.41, A.42

‘Electrical Engineering Practice (“Electric Traction”)’

 

Two certificates, one of them wallet-size, confirming that Hanbury Brown passed the final examination in ‘Electrical Engineering Practice (“Electric Traction”)’.

 

 

1935

A.43

Bachelor of Science, University of London

 

Certificate confirming that Hanbury Brown obtained the degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering as an External Student and was awarded honours of the first class, 10 August 1935.

 

 

 

1935

A.44, A.45

Imperial College, London

 

 

 

1935, 1938

A.44

Registration

 

Certificate from the University of London confirming Hanbury Brown’s registration as an Internal Student of the University in the Faculty of Engineering at ‘City & Guilds (Engineering) College)’.

 

City & Guilds was then part of Imperial College.

 

 

 

1935

A.45

Diploma

 

Diploma of membership of the Imperial College of Science and Technology, based on Hanbury Brown’s successful completion of a course of advanced studies in electrical communications, 1935-1936.

 

The diploma is dated 8 June 1938.

 

 

 

1938

A.46

University of Manchester

 

Mounted certificate of Hanbury Brown’s admission as a doctor of science of the University of Manchester.

 

The degree was conferred on Hanbury Brown on 15 July 1960.

 

 

 

 

1960

A.47-A.68

CAREER, HONOURS AND AWARDS

 

 

 

Chiefly certificates. In addition to these awards 1959-1989, Hanbury Brown also won the Eddington Medal (1968) and the Lyle Medal of the Australian Academy of Science (1970).

 

1935-1997

A.47-A.49

Royal Air Force, London University Air Squadron

 

 

1935-1937

A.47

Log book

 

Hardback log book detailing Hanbury Brown’s flying experience.

 

 

1935-1936

A.48

Certificate of proficiency

 

 

 

1936

A.49

Flying licence

 

Certificate of competency and licence to fly private flying machines, issued by the Air Ministry.

 

 

 

1936-1937

A.50, A.51

Membership, Institute of Radio Engineers

 

Certificate, two slightly different copies.

 

 

 

1945

A.52

The Holweck Prize of the Institute of Physics

 

Mounted certificate.

 

The Holweck Prize was instituted as a memorial to Fernand Holweck and other French physicists who suffered privation or met their death at the hands of the Germans during the occupation of France in 1940-1944.

 

 

 

1959

A.53

Election to Fellowship of the Royal Society

 

Certificate, dated 24 March 1960.

 

 

 

1960

A.54

Fellowship, Astronomical Society of Australia

 

Certificate.

 

 

 

1966

A.55

Hughes Medal of the Royal Society

 

Certificate.

 

 

 

1971

A.56

Britannica Australia Award

 

Mounted certificate, Science Citation, Britannica Australia Awards.

 

 

 

1971

A.57

Fellowship, Indian National Science Academy, India

 

Certificate of election to Fellowship of the Indian National Science Academy, 10 October 1975.

 

 

 

1975

A.58-A.60

Albert A. Michelson Medal of the Franklin Institute, USA

 

The Michelson Medal was awarded jointly to Hanbury Brown and R. Q. Twiss for their contributions to opening up the subject of quantum optics.

 

 

1982

A.58

Mounted certificate

 

 

 

 

A.59

Citation

 

 

 

 

A.60

Life membership

 

Certificate and laminated card.

 

 

 

 

A.61, A.62

Doctor of Science (Honoris Causa), University of Sydney, Australia

 

See also A.175.

 

 

1984

A.61

Certificate

 

Dated 17 March 1984.

 

 

 

 

A.62

Citation

 

 

 

 

A.63

Doctor of Science (Honoris Causa), Monash University, Australia

 

Certificate, 30 March 1984. See also F.147.

1984

A.64

Election as an Associate of the Royal Astronomical Society

 

Mounted certificate, dated 14 March 1986.

 

 

 

1986

A.65, A.66

Order of Australia

 

 

1986-1989

A.65

Certificate of notification

 

Dated 9 June 1986.

 

 

 

1986

A.66

Investiture and congratulations

 

Includes correspondence re Hanbury Brown’s nomination, inclusion in the Queen’s Birthday Honours list and the investiture of insignia, and a list of letters of congratulations.

 

 

 

1986-1989

A.67

Membership, Academia Europaea

 

Certificate.

 

 

 

1992

A.68

Honorary Membership, Royal Institute of Navigation

 

Certificate.

 

 

 

 

1997

A.69-A.84

BIOGRAPHICAL CORRESPONDENCE

 

 

Letters from a box file with alphabetical dividers. Retained in original order.

 

 

 

1932-1949, n.d.

A.69

A (1)

 

Includes correspondence from the Air Ministry re Hanbury Brown’s recruitment and subsequent career in the scientific civil service. Also includes correspondence with the Ministry of Supply.

 

 

1936-1947

A.70

A (2)

 

Includes correspondence re Hanbury Brown’s registration with the University of London and his interruption of his studies in order to join the Royal Aircraft Establishment.

 

 

 

1932-1938, 1946

A.71

B (1)

 

Letters from Hanbury Brown’s family, particularly his father and his brother Hassall.

 

 

 

1933-1941, 1946, n.d.

A.72

B (2)

 

Includes letters from Hanbury Brown’s friend B. V. Bowden and his wife, with photographs of their offspring.

 

 

 

1946, n.d.

A.73

D

 

Includes correspondence re Hanbury Brown’s purchase of a Dalmatian dog, ‘Gay Domino’. Includes a photograph.

 

Hanbury Brown took his dog to live with him in Bawdsey Manor on the Suffolk Coast, where he had joined the Research Establishment of the Air Ministry.

 

 

 

1937-1947

A.74

E

 

Contains letters from W. S. Eastwood and his wife, and from the electrical and mechanical engineering firm Elliott Brothers Ltd.

 

Like Hanbury Brown, Eastwood had been a junior member on the team working on radar at Orford Ness, a shingle spit off the Suffolk coast.

 

 

 

1939-1946

A.75

H

 

Includes letters from Hanbury Brown’s legal guardian E. A. Hoghton and from E. E. Hughes, Hanbury Brown’s former teacher and mentor at Brighton Technical College.

 

 

 

 

1932-1946

A.76

I

 

Letters from the Institute of Radio Engineers, New York, USA, the Institution of Electrical Engineers and the Institution of Professional Civil Servants.

 

 

 

1939, 1945-1946

A.77

L (1)

 

Includes letters from the electronics engineer A. V. Loughren.

 

 

 

1946-1947

A.78

L (2)

 

Chiefly letters from Hanbury Brown’s mother. Also includes a letter from his stepfather, J. S. W. Lloyd.

 

 

 

1932, 1936-1946, n.d.

A.79

M, N

 

Includes correspondence with Marconi Wireless Telegraphy Company Ltd re a patent application, and medical and personal correspondence.

 

 

 

1937, 1942, 1946, n.d.

A.80

P

 

Includes letters from Hanbury Brown’s friends D. H. Preist and J. W. S. Pringle.

 

 

 

1946-1947

A.81

R

 

Includes letters from Hanbury Brown’s physician L. Rau and from Radio Corporation of America, attempting to recruit Hanbury Brown.

 

 

 

1941, 1945-1947

A.82

S

 

Includes letters from friends from Hanbury Brown’s years in Washington, DC, USA.

 

 

 

1946-1949

A.83

 

 

/…

T

 

Chiefly letters from Hanbury Brown’s friend and colleague A. G. Touch, re the scientific civil service, career prospects elsewhere and living conditions in postwar Britain. Also includes a letter from Hanbury Brown’s student friend V. J. Tyler and a note from H. T. Tizard.

 

 

 

1938, 1946-1947

/…

A.84

W

 

Chiefly financial papers. Further contains a letter with which Hanbury Brown was welcomed into the Sir Robert Watson Watt & Partners consultancy by its founder.

 

 

 

 

1945-1949

A.85-A.89

COMMEMORATIVE OCCASIONS

 

 

 

1986-1997

A.85, A.86

70th Birthday

 

 

 

1986, 1990

A.85

‘Modern Instrumentation and its Influence on Astronomy’, symposium at Herstmonceux Castle, 24-26 September 1986

 

Chiefly correspondence re this symposium held in celebration of Hanbury Brown’s birthday.

 

 

 

1986

A.86

Copy of the proceedings

 

The proceedings of the symposium appeared as Modern Technology and Its Influence on Astronomy, ed. J. V. Wall and A. Boksenberg (Cambridge, 1990).

 

 

 

1990

A.87-A.89

80th birthday

 

 

 

1996-1997

A.87-A.88

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘Fundamental Stellar Properties’, 189th symposium of the International Astronomical Union, held at the University of Sydney, Australia, 13-17 January 1997

 

Material re this symposium held in celebration of Hanbury Brown’s birthday. Includes draft programme, Hanbury Brown’s notes for his dinner speech, and a copy of the final programme with Hanbury Brown’s corrections inserted.

 

2 folders.

 

The symposium on fundamental stellar properties was held at the Women’s College of the University of Sydney in Australia. In finalising the programme pamphlet, it had been omitted that the symposium marked Hanbury Brown’s 80th birthday.

 

 

 

 

1996-1997

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A.89

Copy of the proceedings

 

The proceedings of the symposium appeared as Fundamental Stellar Properties. The Interactions between Observation and Theory, ed. T. R. Bedding et al. (Kluwer, 1997).

 

 

 

 

1997

A.90-A.148

DIARIES

 

 

 

Hanbury Brown’s appointment diaries for the years 1936, 1940, 1943-1998. Entries in pencil and in ink, including memoranda, notes on expenses, etc.

 

All softback, small pocket-sized, unless stated.

 

Includes also an undated notebook for expenses, ?1961.

 

For 1939, see B.3.

 

 

 

1936-1998

A.90

1936

 

Hardback octavo size, red spine. Contains notes on sports and social appointments, flying lessons and lectures.

 

 

 

 

A.91

1940

 

Green cloth. Many missing entries.

 

Hanbury Brown worked for the Air Ministry Research Establishment (AMRE), renamed Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE) in November 1940.

 

 

 

 

A.92

1943

 

?Quarto size, black leather.

 

Hanbury Brown was in the USA at the time.

 

 

 

 

A.93

1944

 

?Quarto size, black leather. Virtually empty. Includes list of books read during 1944.

 

 

 

 

A.94

1945

 

?Octavo size, ring-bound with patterned black plastic cover.

 

Hanbury Brown was still in the USA until 22 October, when he departed by sea.

 

 

 

 

A.95

1946

 

Dark red cloth.

 

After his return from the USA in November 1945, Hanbury Brown had rejoined the Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE).

 

 

 

 

A.96

1947

 

Green leather.

 

In 1947 Hanbury Brown left the Civil Service and joined the Sir Robert Watson Watt & Partners consultancy.

 

 

 

 

A.97

1948

 

Red leather.

 

Hanbury Brown continued to work for the Sir Robert Watson Watt & Partners consultancy.

 

 

 

 

A.98

 

/…

1949

 

Dark red cloth.

 

Hanbury Brown left the Sir Robert Watson Watt & Partners consultancy and started to work at Jodrell Bank.

 

 

 

 

/…

A.99

1950

 

Brown leather.

 

 

 

 

A.100

1951

 

Green leather.

 

 

 

 

A.101

1952

 

Green leather

 

 

 

 

A.102

1953

 

Brown leather.

 

 

 

 

A.103

1954

 

Green cloth.

 

 

 

 

A.104

1955

 

Dark red cloth.

 

 

 

 

A.105

1956

 

Dark red cloth.

 

 

 

 

A.106

1957

 

Dark red cloth.

 

 

 

 

A.107

1958

 

Dark red cloth.

 

 

 

 

 

A.108

1959

 

Dark red cloth.

 

 

 

 

A.109

1960

 

Black leather, pencil attached.

 

 

 

 

A.110

1961

 

Dark blue leather.

 

 

 

 

A.111

1962

 

Medium blue leather.

 

 

 

 

A.112

1963

 

Black leather.

 

 

 

 

A.113

1964

 

Paper cover, multi-coloured.

 

 

 

 

A.114

1965

 

Light blue cloth.

 

 

 

 

A.115

1966

 

Dark red cloth, pencil in spine.

 

 

 

 

 

A.116

1967

 

Dark blue plastic.

 

 

 

 

A.117

1968

 

Medium blue plastic.

 

 

 

 

A.118

1969

 

Medium blue plastic.

 

 

 

 

A.119

1970

 

Medium blue plastic.

 

 

 

 

A.120

1971

 

Medium blue plastic.

 

 

 

 

A.121

1972

 

Dark blue plastic.

 

 

 

 

A.122

1973

 

Dark blue plastic.

 

 

 

 

A.123

1974

 

Dark blue plastic.

 

 

 

 

A.124

1975

 

Dark green plastic.

 

 

 

 

 

A.125

1976

 

Dark blue plastic.

 

 

 

 

A.126

1977

 

Black plastic, ring binding.

 

 

 

 

A.127

1978

 

Black plastic.

 

 

 

 

A.128

1979

 

Bright red plastic.

 

 

 

 

A.129

1980

 

Turquoise plastic.

 

 

 

 

A.130

1981

 

Yellow plastic.

 

 

 

 

A.131

1982

 

Medium blue plastic.

 

 

 

 

A.132

1983

 

Medium blue plastic.

 

 

 

 

A.133

1984

 

Olive green plastic.

 

 

 

 

 

A.134

1985

 

Black leather.

 

 

 

 

 

A.135

1986

 

Brown plastic.

 

 

 

 

A.136

1987

 

Black plastic.

 

 

 

 

A.137

1988

 

Brown plastic.

 

 

 

 

A.138

1989

 

Grey plastic.

 

 

 

 

A.139

1990

 

Red plastic.

 

 

 

 

A.140

1991

 

Black plastic

 

 

 

 

A.141

1992

 

Medium blue plastic.

 

 

 

 

A.142

1993

 

Black plastic.

 

 

 

 

A.143

1994

 

Dark blue plastic.

 

 

 

 

A.144

1995

 

Black plastic.

 

 

 

 

A.145

1996

 

Black plastic.

 

 

 

 

A.146

1997

 

Black plastic.

 

 

 

 

A.147

1998

 

Red plastic.

 

 

 

 

A.148

n.d.

 

Red paper. Expenses book.

 

 

 

 

?1961

A.149-A.165

DOCUMENTS AND LICENCES

 

 

 

1934-1999

A.149-A.151

Hanbury Brown’s naturalisation as a British citizen

 

Hanbury Brown repeatedly experienced difficulties having his British nationality recognized. The situation was finally resolved when he became naturalised in 1989.

 

 

1934-1989, n.d.

A.149

 

 

 

 

 

 

Documents

 

Includes photocopies of Hanbury Brown’s certificate of birth registration and other documents testifying to his and his wife’s British origins. Hanbury Brown was born at Aravankadu in Southern India, Heather at Yakusu in what was then the Belgian Congo.

 

 

 

1934, 1935, 1964, n.d.

 

 

 

 

A.150, A.151

Correspondence

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

1974, 1987-1989

A.152-A.162

British and Australian passports

 

11 folders.

 

 

 

1934-1999

A.163

 

 

Driver’s Licences

 

2 driver’s licences, one issued in 1934 and renewed to 1960, the second issued in 1960 and renewed to 1966.

 

 

 

1934-1966

 

A.164

Civilian’s Pass

 

Royal Air Force civilian staff pass, dated 10 October 1936, permitting Hanbury Brown to enter and leave Bawdsey Research Station at any time.

 

 

 

1936

A.165

National Identity Card, Medical Card and sundry documents

 

 

 

 

1943-1977

A.166-A.178

PERSONAL FILE

 

 

 

Contents of a folder inscribed ‘personal’.

 

 

 

1951-1992

A.166-A.177

Letters, personal

 

 

 

1951-1992

A.166

 

 

 

 

 

 

A

 

Includes correspondence with the Australian Academy of Science re Hanbury Brown’s potential candidature as their president. Also includes correspondence re Hanbury Brown’s ANZAAS medal.

 

The Australian and New Zealand Association for the Advancement of Science (ANZAAS) chose Hanbury Brown as their medallist for 1986.

 

 

 

1981-1989

 

 

 

 

 

A.167

B-D

 

Includes correspondence re the Australian interferometers in whose creation Hanbury Brown was involved. Also includes correspondence re his candidature for membership of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences.

 

 

 

1962-1988

A.168

 

 

F-H

 

Includes correspondence with B. H. Flowers re the future of optical astronomy in the UK. Also includes an offer of the directorship of the Anglo-Australian Telescope and correspondence re the directorship of the Research School of Physical Sciences at the Australian National University.

 

 

 

1962-1981

 

A.169

I-M

 

Includes correspondence with W. Mansfield Cooper re Hanbury Brown’s delayed return from Australia.

 

W. Mansfield Cooper was the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Manchester, 1956-1970.

 

 

 

1962-1983

A.170

O-R

 

Includes Hanbury Brown’s notes on his experiences travelling with unscheduled carriers.

 

 

 

1970-1989

A.171

Royal Society

 

Correspondence re material for Hanbury Brown’s Biographical Memoir. Includes a biographical summary.

 

See also A.19-A.25.

 

 

 

1986-1987

A.172

 

 

Templeton Foundation

 

Correspondence with the Templeton Foundation re A. C. B. Lovell’s nomination for the Templeton Prize.

 

The Templeton Prize is awarded annually for progress toward research or discoveries about spiritual realities.

 

 

 

1979

 

A.173

University of Manchester

 

Correspondence re Hanbury Brown’s career at the University of Manchester, including his promotion to Professor of Radio-Astronomy in 1959. Also contains a resolution passed by the members of Senate and Council in recognition of his contribution while a member of the university.

 

 

 

1951-1964

A.174, A.175

University of Sydney

 

 

1963-1987

A.174

1963

 

Correspondence re the offer of a professorial chair at the University of Sydney.

 

 

 

 

A.175

1979-1987

 

Includes correspondence re Hanbury Brown’s retirement in 1981, his subsequent appointment as Foundation Research Fellow at the Science Foundation for Physics within the University, and his award of an honorary degree of Doctor of Science in 1984. See A.61, A.62.

 

 

 

 

A.176

U-W

 

Includes correspondence with Sir Richard Woolley re Hanbury Brown becoming Chief Assistant at the Royal Greenwich Observatory, and with J. R. Whitehead re Hanbury Brown's possible candidacy as Dominion Astronomer in Ottawa, Canada.

 

R. v. d. R. Woolley was the Astronomer Royal, 1956-1971. Whitehead knew Hanbury Brown from their war work on radar.

 

 

 

 

 

1961-1985

A.177

Miscellaneous

 

Various biographical memorabilia.

 

Includes a list of individuals and institutions who Hanbury Brown notified of his change of address when moving to Britain.

 

 

 

1971, ?1978, 1989-1992

A.178

Letters medical

 

 

 

 

1963, 1985

A.179-A.200

FAMILY

 

 

 

1931-1999

A.179

E. A. Hoghton

 

Hardback notebook, originally belonging to Hanbury Brown’s legal guardian E. A. Hoghton. Used from the front for Hoghton’s notes on electrical phenomena. Used from the back for Hanbury Brown’s notes, circuit diagrams and draft essays on such topics as the object of reading scientific journals and what subject to specialise in. Includes loose sheets with Hanbury Brown’s notes and jottings.

 

Hoghton was a consulting radio engineer. Following the divorce of Hanbury Brown’s parents, he had been appointed Hanbury Brown’s legal guardian.

 

 

 

1911, 1936, n.d.

 

A.180-A.194

H. H. Brown

 

Hanbury Brown’s love letters to his future wife, Heather, and his letters home after they were married early in 1952. Includes his description of the 10th General Assembly of the International Scientific Radio Union (URSI), Sydney, August 1952, when URSI met for the first time in the Southern hemisphere (see A.190), and of the 12th General Assembly of URSI in Boulder, Colorado, USA, in 1957 (see A.193). Among other locations, Hanbury Brown also wrote from the Observatoire du Pic-du-Midi, France, in 1961.

 

A.180 contains an obituary of Heather, who died in June 2003.

 

15 folders.

 

 

1951-1967, 2003

A.195-A.198

B. O. Blaker

 

Chiefly correspondence between solicitors and Hanbury Brown re the will of his uncle, B. O. Blaker.

 

4 folders.

 

 

 

1931, 1942-1950

A.199

Family Letters

 

 

 

1972-1999

A.200

Sermon

 

An address given by Hanbury Brown in Longworth Church on the occasion of the wedding of his god-daughter, J. Cooke-Yarborough.

 

Hanbury Brown had known J. Cooke-Yarborough’s father Ted from his war-work on radar.

 

 

 

 

1986

A.201-A.207

PHOTOGRAPHS

 

 

 

c.1940-c.2000

A.201

Portraits of Hanbury Brown

 

4 photographs.

 

Studio portrait, c. 1940.

 

Photograph of a poster illustrating Hanbury Brown’s life 1920-1962.

 

Portrait, February 1978.

 

Computer-print of digital image, c. 2000.

 

 

 

c.1940-c.2000

A.202, A.203

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Family photographs

 

14 photographs.

 

1 photograph of the Hanbury Browns, taken in the garden of their Sussex estate, Newlands.

 

4 photographs of Hanbury Brown’s father Basil (1933 and n.d.), with a covering letter from Hanbury Brown’s stepmother Phyllis.

 

3 photographs 1961-1968.

 

6 photographs from the 1990s, with a covering letter.

 

2 folders.

 

The contents of the second folder were sent from ‘Louise’, a relative (probably the wife of Hanbury Brown’s uncle Cedric Blaker).

 

 

 

n.d., 1933, 1961-1968, 1990x2000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A.204

 

 

 

Original radar team

 

Mounted photograph of a poster entitled ‘Original Airborne Radar Team 1936-1943’. With portraits and snapshots of A. G. Touch, Hanbury Brown and B. D. W. White, E. G. Bowen, P. A. Hibberd, K. A. Wood, and a group photograph of the Radar Experimental Flight Team at Martlesham Heath, 1938.

 

 

 

n.d.

 

 

 

A.205

 

 

 

Radar in Washington, DC, USA

 

Photograph, with original inscribed envelope, at a cocktail party.

 

 

 

1943x1945

 

 

A.206

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Group photographs

 

4 photographs.

 

Photograph 1 shows E. G. Bowen, A. L. Hodgkin and Hanbury Brown having a pub lunch at Worth Matravers, 1940.

 

Photograph 2 shows J. G. Bolton and Hanbury Brown socialising at the 10th General Assembly of URSI in Sydney, August 1952. Bolton and Hanbury Brown became members of an URSI sub-committee that was set up on this occasion to furnish a special report on discrete sources of galactic noise. For this report, see G.9.

 

Photograph 3, a photograph of a meeting hosted by the CSIRO Division of Radiophysics in November 1977, is accompanied by a compliments slip listing the names of those shown in the picture. The Division of Radiophysics of CSIRO (the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation) was located in Epping, a suburb of Sydney, also the headquarters of the Anglo-Australian Telescope which had opened in 1974.

 

Photograph 4 shows E. G. Bowen and Hanbury Brown socialising with two unidentified colleagues, possibly at a conference on the history of radar in 1985. A conference on ‘The history of radar development’ was hosted by the Institution of Electrical Engineers (IEE) in its London headquarters in June 1985.

 

 

 

1940, 1952, 1977, c.1985

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A.207

White Cottage, Penton Mewsey

 

Colour photograph of the Hanbury Brown residence following their return from Australia.

 

 

 

 

n.d.

A.208-A.210

MISCELLANEOUS

 

 

 

1939-1983, n.d.

A.208

Hanbury Brown’s account book

 

Hardback notebook listing Hanbury Brown’s living expenses and investments.

 

 

 

1939-1983

A.209

Hanbury Brown’s joke file

 

 

 

n.d.

A.210

Memorabilia

 

Includes a listing of Hanbury Brown’s books and journals prior to his relocation back to the UK, a travel check list, and jokes and quotations (presumably from his study).

 

 

 

n.d.

 

5

 

 

SECTION B

RADAR, B.1-B.57

 

 

 

1937-2001

B.1-B.39†††††††††† WAR WORK

 

 

B.40-B.51††††††††† PATENTS

 

 

B.52-B.57††††††††† REUNIONS

 

 

See also E.1-E.38.

 

B.1-B.39

WAR WORK

 

 

 

1937-1996

B.1, B.2

Early experiments at Martlesham

 

Handwritten notes and typescript memoranda on bombing trials and signal strength measurements. Data collected mostly in 1938 at Martlesham Heath and typed up in 1940. Includes original sleeve, which refers to Hanbury Brown’s notebook (see B.4).

 

2 folders.

 

The RAF station at Martlesham Heath near Bawdsey was where the early airborne radar group tested their equipment.

 

 

 

1938-1940

B.3

Diary

 

Foolscap size hardback diary used to record daily R&D activities up to 19 June.

 

 

 

1939

B.4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

'Calculations'

 

Foolscap hardback notebook, containing calculations, circuit diagrams, draft memoranda and jottings. Also contains a draft letter to G. P. Chamberlain re difficulties in using airborne radar.

 

Wing Commander G. P. Chamberlain was in charge of the experimental Fighter Interception Unit (FIU) at Tangmere, where Hanbury Brown spent considerable time testing equipment prototypes in 1940 and 1941. The expression ‘boffin’ (for a technological expert) is rumoured to have been coined by him, with Hanbury Brown in mind.

 

 

 

c.1940

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

B.5-B.12

Air to Surface Vessel

 

 

Material re the development of Air to Surface Vessel (ASV) equipment, including a history.

 

ASV was developed for airborne detection of ships and surfaced submarines at night or when visibility is bad.

 

 

 

1939-1946

B.5

‘Submarine Trials’

 

Exercise book with loose sheets intercalated, containing notes and drawings including a draft report on the first test of airborne radar on submarines at Gosport, 2-9 December 1939.

 

At this time Hanbury Brown was working at Northolt.

 

 

 

c.1939

B.6

‘Notes on ASV’

 

Typescript memoranda, minutes of a conference and handwritten notes on ASV.

 

Shortly after the outbreak of World War II, Bawdsey Research Station was evacuated to Dundee. For the airborne group the move was not successful and they were soon moved to St Athan’s in South Wales, where Hanbury Brown joined them at the end of November 1939.

 

 

 

c.1940

B.7

‘Letters’

 

Foolscap hardback notebook, previously inscribed 'ASV equipment'. Chiefly contains draft letters to Hanbury Brown's superintendent in the Air Ministry Research Establishment (AMRE).

 

 

 

1940

B.8

Untitled

 

Hardback notebook containing draft letters, circuit diagrams, calculations and jotting re ASV and Air Intercept (AI).

 

 

c.1940-1941

B.9

‘ASV Recorder’

 

Typescript memoranda re ASV recorder and warning system, with circuit diagrams. Also contains an offprint on the electronic recording of weak electric currents, by F. E. Ludkin.

 

The object of the ASV recorder was to produce a permanent record of echoes detected by the ASV apparatus. The ASV warning system, which was meant to warn the operator of the presence of an echo, had not reached a practical state of use.

 

 

 

1941

B.10-B.12

 

‘ASV Monograph’

 

Drafts of a monograph on ASV co-authored by Hanbury Brown, his superintendent R. A. Smith and other members of the scientific civil service.

 

B.10 contains typescripts of the outline and of Hanbury Brown’s chapters, B.11 a longhand draft of a further chapter and photographs of airborne radar equipment, and B.12 technical drawings (notably circuit diagrams).

 

3 folders.

 

After returning from the USA and to the Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE) in November 1945, Hanbury Brown spent a year helping the Air Historical Branch of the Air Ministry write up an account of airborne radar - the ‘ASV monograph’.

 

 

 

1939-1946

B.13-B.25

Air Intercept

 

 

Material re the development of Air Intercept (AI) equipment.

 

AI was developed for airborne detection of other aircraft at night or when visibility is bad.

 

 

 

1937-1996

B.13

Notebook

 

Hardback notebook, inscribed ‘K. A. Wood Northolt 1939 Sept MK I AI trials 25 Sqdn’. Contains notes of flights and calculations.

 

 

 

c.1939

B.14

‘Interception’

 

Reports and a memorandum on interception, the latter dubbed ‘Dowding’s memo’.

 

 

 

1940

B.15

‘Equipment’

 

Typescript reports on RDF2, notes on equipment tests and typescript summary of failings.

 

RDF2 referred to the sender and receiver in the aircraft. The expression was used to distinguish it from the ground-based equipment programme, called RDF1. RDF (Radiolocation and Direction Finding) was an early name for Radar (Radio detection and ranging).

 

 

 

1937, 1940

B.16-B.20

‘Aircraft Aerials’

 

Notes and polar diagrams of different arrays. B.20 contains photographs.

 

5 folders.

 

 

 

1938-1940

B.21-B.23

‘Pilot Indicator’

 

 

1940-1941, 1991-1996

B.21, B.22

1940-1941

 

Typescripts of memoranda and circuit diagrams. B.21 also includes a diagrammatic recording of a test with Mark IV(a).

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

 

B.23

1991-1996

 

Correspondence with P. Racher, including a photocopy of a memorandum on windscreen projection with Mark VIII, c. 1941.

 

P. Racher was a World War II radar equipment buff.

 

 

 

 

B.24, B.25

 

 

 

Correspondence

 

Includes a copy of a memorandum on interception sent to Churchill by Lord Cherwell in October 1940. Also contains correspondence with the radar history buff I. G. White, including White’s typescript on the FIU.

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

1988, 1993

 

 

B.26

Tizard mission

 

 

Letter from E. G. Bowen, 11 September 1940.

 

E. G. Bowen, the head of the airborne radar team, wrote to Hanbury Brown while en route to Washington, DC, USA, where he joined the ‘Tizard Mission’. Tizard’s mission was to secure British-American collaboration on air defence, starting with disclosure of British secrets in return for help on technical and production problems.

 

 

 

1940

B.27-B.35

 

 

 

Rebecca/Eureka

 

 

The Rebecca/Eureka project involved an airborne transmitter/receiver set (Rebecca) and a ground beacon (Eureka). This set-up involved separate ‘response’ signals, not the reflected signals of radar in the proper sense. The primary idea was for a friendly aircraft to be able to drop supplies to a beleaguered force on the ground with great accuracy.

 

 

1941-1946, 1985, 1990

B.27-B.29

Notebooks

 

Hardback notebooks.

 

 

1941-1942

B.27

‘Rebecca 1941’

 

Contains draft memoranda. Many pages have been torn out.

 

 

 

1941

B.28

‘Letters’ (1)

 

Contains notes of visits and tests, draft letters and jottings.

 

 

 

1941

B.29

 

 

‘Letters’ (2)

 

Contains draft letters and notes, with loose sheets and carbon copies of typed memoranda intercalated. Some pages have been torn out.

 

 

 

1941-1942

 

B.30

‘Experimental homing set’

 

Draft circuit diagrams, with original folder.

 

 

 

1941

B.31

Memoranda

 

4 typescripts.

 

‘Provisional description of an ultra portable responder beacon’, 31 July 1942 (circuit diagram attached).

 

‘Rebecca homing system’, 17 August 1942 (equipment table attached).

 

‘Installation for Rebecca Mark 2’, 25 August 1942.

 

‘Rebecca and Eureka equipment, chapter 1’, n.d.

 

 

 

1942

B.32

‘Circuit diagrams of beacons’

 

Contains a set of circuit diagrams from ASV beacon to Rebecca beacon, ‘General layout’ sheets, a list of circuit diagrams issued and 3 photographs of equipment, with a covering letter by R. Trim. Also includes technical manuals for the use of equipment (in original envelopes).

 

R. Trim was an engineer who started to work on Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) equipment in the mid-1950s. IFF had been developed as a means of positively distinguishing friendly from enemy aircraft. It relied on a piece of equipment aboard the aircraft, known as the ‘transponder’ (a receiver/transmitter).

 

 

 

1941-1943, 1990

B.33

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Correspondence

 

Correspondence with J. W. S. Pringle re the transfer of the airborne radar team to the USA and re continued work on Rebecca/Eureka. Also includes an original technical manual for a Eureka beacon type AN/PPN-1, printed in Washington, DC, USA.

 

J. W. S. Pringle was a Cambridge biologist with whom Hanbury Brown developed Rebecca/Eureka. Hanbury Brown had departed for the USA in December 1942 and they continued to collaborate by correspondence. The design for the American Eureka beacon type AN/PPN-1 was Hanbury Brown’s.

 

 

 

1943

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

B.34

‘History of Rebecca/Eureka’ by E. K. Williams

 

Typescript of E. K. Williams’ account of Rebecca/Eureka.

 

E. K. Williams was one of the key figures in the development of Rebecca/Eureka.

 

 

 

1985

B.35

‘Report on Flight to Singapore

 

Hanbury Brown’s report on a flying mission to conduct navigation tests, 15 January-15 February 1946. Includes Hanbury Brown’s original data recording sheets detailing the ‘Maximum range of Eurekas between UK and Singapore observed between 15 January and 15 February’ and ‘Signal noise ratio of a typical Eureka Beacon, Jodhpur observed at 10000 feet’ (with copies).

 

Hanbury Brown accompanied the mission as a Technical Observer from the TRE navigation division.

 

 

 

1946

B.36-B.38

‘Private’

 

 

Material from a file further inscribed ‘Quem deus perdere vult prius dementat’.

 

 

1937-1947

B.36

1937-1940

 

Includes communications re working and living arrangements in Bawdsey Research Station, the Air Ministry Research Establishment and TRE. Also contains the original folder sleeve.

 

 

 

 

B.37

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1941-1947

 

Includes correspondence and memoranda, and newspaper cuttings on persons credited with the discovery of radar. Further includes material re morale within TRE following the end of World War II and re the conversion of GEE for civil use.

 

After his return to TRE in 1945 Hanbury Brown worked on the application of the pulsed navigational aid GEE (short for ‘Grid’ and pronounced simply as ‘G’) to civil aviation. Support for this plan was not universal even within TRE. Hanbury Brown represented the UK delegation to the Provisional International Civil Aviation Organisation (PICAO) in Montreal in 1946, where he discovered that GEE was too large, too heavy, too expensive and too complicated to operate for it to offer a promising technology for international civil aviation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

B.38

n.d.

 

Includes a poem on the ‘radar man’ and a report on the GEE system.

 

 

 

 

B.39

‘Interservices radar manual, volume II, Radar techniques’ (Air Ministry, first edition, June 1946)

 

 

 

 

1946

B.40-B.51

PATENTS

 

 

 

1942-1954

B.40-B.42

‘Patents’

 

 

Contents of a folder so inscribed.

 

 

1942-1954

B.40

Declarations and correspondence

 

Includes typescript memoranda and applications for patents.

 

 

 

1942-1954

B.41, B.42

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hanbury Brown’s research reports

 

Photostats of Hanbury Brown’s handwritten research reports, signed and witnessed by Hanbury Brown, B. V. Bowden and W. T. Jessup. The reports cover ‘Side lobe suppression’, pp. 23-26, June 1944; ‘A method of controlling the sensitivity of a Transponder System’, pp. 179-191, April 1945; ‘A rotating racon system’, pp. 192-203, April 1945; ‘A method of improving the azimuth discrimination of an IFF system’, pp. 204-215, p. 212 missing, May 1945.

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

?1945

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

B.43-B.51

 

 

Royal Commission on Awards to Inventors

 

 

Material re a claim on the part of the airborne radar team for an award for the design and development of metre-wave airborne radar.

 

Upon hearing that R. Watson-Watt had lodged a claim for the invention of airborne radar, members of the original airborne radar team resolved to put in for their share of an award. The initiative came from E. G. Bowen. A claim syndicate emerged, thus widening the scope of the claim to cover all radar innovation concerning the RAF.

 

 

1949-1953

 

B.43

A. G. Touch letters

 

Letters from A. G. Touch, a member of the original airborne radar team. Touch continued in the scientific civil service.

 

 

 

1950-1951

B.44, B.45

Correspondence re syndicate claim

 

 

1950-1953

B.44

1950

 

Correspondence between E. G. Bowen, Hanbury Brown, A. G. Touch and the Ministry of Supply.

 

 

 

 

B.45

1951-1953

 

Includes correspondence with the Royal Commission on Awards to Inventors. Also includes correspondence re the shares of the award.

 

 

 

 

B.46, B.47

Syndicate claims

 

Copies of the claims of E. G. Bowen, Hanbury Brown (several drafts), R. H. A. Carter and P. E. Pollard.

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

 

1949-1951

B.48, B.49

Answers syndicate claims

 

‘Department’s Answer’ of the Royal Commission to the claims of R. Watson-Watt, A. G. Touch, K. C. Budden, A. F. Wilkins, D. Taylor, E. J. Dickie and B. J. O’Kane, Hanbury Brown, and E. G. Bowen.

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

1951

 

B.50, B.51

Dewhurst claim

 

Typescript statement, with appendices.

 

2 folders.

 

H. Dewhurst did not join the claim syndicate and handed in a separate claim.

 

 

 

 

1951

 

B.52-B.57

REUNIONS

 

 

 

Correspondence, minutes and programmes.

 

 

 

1991-2001, n.d.

B.52-B.56

Radar Reunions

 

 

Material on the annual Air Force Radar Reunions. Includes drafts of Hanbury Brown’s banquet speech at the 1994 reunion in Blackpool.See also J.23.

 

The World War II Air Force Radar Reunion took place in 1991 in Coventry, under the patronage of A. C. B. Lovell. It inaugurated a series of annual reunions.

 

 

 

1991-2001

B.52

1991-1993

 

Includes photographs and a request from the Radar Reunion Committee for Hanbury Brown to be Patron of the 1994 reunion in Blackpool.

 

 

 

 

B.53-B.55

1994 (Blackpool)

 

Minutes of the Radar Reunion Committee and correspondence, including a letter from the radar historian L. Brown. Further includes Hanbury Brown’s banquet speech on 21 May.

 

3 folders.

 

The 1994 Radar Reunion convened 20-22 May in Blackpool. L. Brown was an emeritus professor in the terrestrial magnetism department of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, who attended the reunion as an outsider. His A Radar History of World War II: Technical and Military Imperatives appeared in 1999.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

B.56

1995-2001

 

Correspondence, minutes and programme information re Radar Reunions.

 

 

 

 

B.57

Bawdsey reunions

 

Chiefly circular letters re the Bawdsey lunches. Also includes an earlier photograph of a reunion celebrating Bawdsey Research Station, 1935-1939.

 

RAF Bawdsey Reunions met for lunch in the Manor each year on the first Saturday in June.

 

 

 

2000, n.d.

 

5

 

 

SECTION C

JODRELL BANK, C.1-C.13

 

 

 

 

After the end of World War II, P. M. S. Blackett and A. C. B. Lovell assembled a group of radar researchers in Manchester. They established themselves at Jodrell Bank, a field twenty miles south of Manchester that was owned by the University.

 

 

 

 

c.1949-1962, 1966

C.1

Letter to J. A. Ratcliffe, 9 June

 

The letter outlines a radio interferometer of high resolution.

 

 

 

1950

C.2

Cassiopeia

 

Pen-recorded inscription of a radio signal received on 1 August 1950 between 01:56 and 03:49, recording the transit of the intense radio source Cassiopeia through the beam of the 218 ft paraboloid at Jodrell Bank.

 

 

 

1950

C.3

Steerable telescope

 

Hardback bound copy of A. C. B. Lovell’s ‘Memorandum on a 250ft aperture Steerable Radio Telescope’ (1951).

 

Construction of this telescope (known as ‘Mark 1A’) began in October 1952. Mark 1A entered service only a few months before it was involved in tracking the Soviet Sputnik satellite in October 1957. In 1987 it was renamed the ‘Lovell Telescope’.

 

 

 

1951

C.4, C.5

‘A proposal for a Radio Interferometer’

 

Carbon copy of a proposal by Hanbury Brown, outlining his plans for a radio interferometer. Includes original drawings of the figures.

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

?1952

C.6

 

 

 

 

 

Promoting Jodrell Bank

 

Articles on radio telescopy at Jodrell Bank, by A. C. B. Lovell. Includes a reprint from London Calling, 21 August 1952, and the February 1953 issue of the popular magazine Sky and Telescope.

 

 

 

1952-1953

 

 

 

 

C.7

Sirius inscription

 

Pen-recorded inscription of signal received on 15 November 1955 between 21:30 and 02:40.

 

Hanbury Brown first tested his intensity interferometer on the star Sirius. He published the observational details (gathered in November and December 1955) and the results a year later in a paper (with the mathematician R. Q. Twiss). Earlier in 1956, Hanbury Brown and Twiss had elucidated the principle behind these measurements, arguing on the basis of a laboratory experiment that the time of arrival of photons at two separate detectors was correlated (Hanbury Brown-Twiss effect). Their subsequent publication of the Sirius data demonstrated how this phenomenon could be used in an interferometer to measure the apparent angular diameter of bright visual stars. The Sirius-paper provided a practical vindication of the then much-disputed Hanbury Brown-Twiss effect.

 

 

 

1955

C.8

Sirius notebook

 

Hardback notebook, used from the front for calculations of signal/noise ratio and angular diameter of Sirius, estimates of performance of a system with larger mirrors and of errors in calculated diameter. Used from the back for measurements on Sirius.

 

 

 

1955-1956

C.9

‘A proposal for a Photoelectric Stellar Interferometer’

 

Typescript account, with appendix and diagram, of the plan to submit a proposal for a stellar interferometer to be funded by the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research.

 

In 1956, Hanbury Brown and his colleague R. Q. Twiss began work on a proposal for a stellar interferometer to measure the angular diameter of main sequence stars.

 

 

 

1956

C.10

Optical interferometer notebook

 

Hardback notebook, containing calculations and tests of sample equipment for the proposed stellar interferometer. Also includes Hanbury Brown’s notes on the first tests with the actual instrument (see D.11).

 

 

1959-1962

C.11

‘Specification for a Stellar Interferometer’

 

Hanbury Brown’s personal and annotated hardback copy of a design study for a stellar interferometer. Contains also a loose typescript ‘Provisional schedule of equipment to be supplied’, 30 April 1959, and a newspaper clipping about Narrabri, Guardian, 5 April 1966.

 

The design study had been carried out by the Sheffield construction firm Dunford & Elliott Ltd. The instrument was built at Narrabri near Sydney in New South Wales, Australia. In situ assembly of the (mostly) British components began in 1962. See Section D.

 

 

 

1959, 1966

C.12, C.13

Photographs

 

 

c. 1949-c.1955

C.12

Various individuals

 

2 photographs.

 

Photograph 1 features Hanbury Brown and C. Hazard looking at the output of the 218 foot paraboloid.

 

Photograph 2 features R. C. Jennison and M. K. Das Gupta.

 

C. Hazard, R. C. Jennison and M. K. Das Gupta were Hanbury Brown’s research students.

 

 

 

 

C.13

Equipment

 

6 photographs featuring the Jodrell Bank site and various equipment.

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

SECTION D

AUSTRALIA, D.1-D.43

 

 

 

 

1958-1999, n.d.

D.1-D.24†††††††††† NARRABRI STELLAR INTENSITY INTERFEROMETER

 

 

D.25-D.38††††††††† SYDNEY UNIVERSITY STELLAR INTERFEROMETER

 

 

D.39†††††††††††††††† ANGLO-AUSTRALIAN TELESCOPE

 

 

D.40-D.42††††††††† ‘RESEARCH IN THE UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY

 

 

D.43†††††††††††††††† PHOTOGRAPH ALBUM

 

 

D.1-D.24

NARRABRI STELLAR INTENSITY INTERFEROMETER

 

 

 

Chiefly photographic documentation re the Narrabri Stellar Intensity Interferometer (NSII).

 

The NSII site was twelve miles from the town of Narrabri in northern New South Wales, Australia, about 350 miles from Sydney by road, and about 600 ft above sea level. In situ assembly of the instrument began in spring 1962. It was successfully tested on Vega in 1963, finally going into service in 1965.

 

 

 

1958-1975, n.d.

D.1-D.3

Correspondence

 

 

 

1958-1975

D.1

Specifications and expense estimates

 

Chiefly correspondence with R. Q. Twiss.

 

 

 

1958-1959

D.2, D.3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mechanical and financial problems

 

Chiefly correspondence between Dunford & Elliott, Ltd., H. Messel, Hanbury Brown, W. Mansfield Cooper and Mullard Ltd. Also includes correspondence with the Air Force Office of Scientific Research of the American Department of Defense and a financial statement of the Chatterton Astronomy Department.

 

2 folders.

Mullard Ltd supplied the correlator of the NSII. The Chatterton Astronomy Department of Sydney University was named after the wealthy donor S. Chatterton (see D.7).

 

 

 

1962-1963, 1970, 1975

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D.4-D.17

Photographs

 

 

See also D.43.

 

 

1961-1969

D.4

Model

 

Monochrome photograph of a model of a reflector.

 

The model was made by Dunford & Elliott and was about six inches high. It was used as part of a ‘sales kit’ to persuade the DSIR to fund the project.

 

 

 

n.d.

D.5

Site

 

1 photograph and 1 negative of the NSII site.

 

The interferometer was built on property belonging to P. Miller.

 

 

 

n.d.

D.6-D.13

Construction

 

 

1961x1965

D.6

Assembly of the reflectors

 

7 monochrome photographs of the reflector frameworks prior to shipping.

 

All component parts except the correlator were completed by August 1961. Time and financial constraints prevented proper assembly and testing, but the reflector frameworks were assembled on the shipyard of Saunders-Roe at Beaumaris and given a few tests. The weight of the hexagonal mirrors (252 on each reflector) had to be simulated because they were shipped directly from Italy (where they were made) to Australia.

 

 

 

1961

D.7-D.10

 

 

 

 

Assembly of the interferometer

 

Assembly of the interferometer (minus the correlator) began soon after Hanbury Brown’s arrival in Australia in January 1962. Tests of the reflectors were delayed by damage to some of the hexagonal mirrors during the removal of the protective plastic coating. Gaps in the light collecting surface of the reflectors show which mirrors needed recoating or other work done.

 

 

 

1962x1965

 

 

 

 

D.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

/…

Photographs identified by J. Davis

 

8 photographs.

 

Communication from Prof. John Davis, 27 January 2007:

 

Photograph 1: ‘Hanbury on one of the reflectors. Here the mirrors have had their coatings removed - the missing ones have gone back to Italy for recoating.’

 

Photograph 2: ‘The person with Hanbury is the late Professor Ed Ney from the University of Minnesota who spent a sabbatical year with us.’

 

Photograph 3: ‘The man on the left of Hanbury is Professor Ed Ney again (see Photograph 2).’

 

Photograph 4: ‘On the left is Mr. Tony Smith from the Sheffield firm Dunford and Elliot who were responsible for the entire control system of the instrument. Tony was with us for a long time - I am not sure just how long but it was more than 2 years - installing and commissioning the control system. On the right is the late Mr. Graham Gifford who lived in Narrabri and was our caretaker for the life of the instrument. As a piece of trivia it turned out that he went to the same school as me in Essex although a bit before me!’

 

Photograph 5: ‘The man with Hanbury is Lord De L’Isle, Governor General of Australia (1961-65). The occasion was a visit by the Governor General to the Intensity Interferometer at Narrabri [in March 1964].’

 

Photograph 6: ‘This was the same occasion with Lord De L’Isle being welcomed to the Intensity Interferometer. The man introducing the Governor General to the line of people is the late Mr Stan Chatterton who made a major donation to the School and after whom the Chatterton Astronomy Department that Hanbury and I headed was named. I think the donation was £200,000 in ~1960. Unfortunately, since I retired, the named Departments in the School, of which there were five, have been abolished. The people in the line-up from the left are: Professor Harry Messel, Head of the School of Physics at the time, Hanbury, Mr. Peter Miller (hidden by the Governor General but the owner of the property on which the interferometer was built), Betty Miller (Peter’s wife), myself, Dr Roy Allen, Mr Michael Yerbury (a Ph.D. student, now Dr Yerbury). Regarding the mirrors - they certainly look as if they may still have the protective coating on them but I really can’t remember and the reflection can be very confusing depending on how far away from the mirrors you are.’

 

Photograph 7: ‘This was unrealistic but made for a good picture! The people in the picture are Peter Miller, the property owner on the left with his horse, and our caretaker Graham Gifford on the right. As you can see, if the reflector was moved, they would be in the way of the catenary cable. This [photograph] is unrealistic as they are boiling a billy - with a proper kitchen 50 metres away - in a position that would stop the reflector being moved. [This photographer] liked the idea of capturing the outback feeling for the picture!’

 

Photograph 8: ‘I think it is Hanbury standing on the reflector and I am fairly sure that the face reflected is that of Graham Gifford with more hair and a beard that he didn’t have in earlier pictures.’

 

 

 

1962x1965

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

/…

D.8-D.10

Other photographs

 

20 monochrome photographs. These include images of details of the hexagonal mirrors, mounted on the reflectors; pictures of Hanbury Brown, visiting astronomers, the engineers and photographers together with the reflectors; and further photographs from the official visit of the Governor General of Australia (see D.7).

 

3 folders.

 

 

 

1962x1965

D.11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First tests

 

7 monochrome photographs, taken during the first reflector testing. The reflectors were pointed horizontally at a distant gum tree on which a lamp had been mounted. After each of the 252 mirrors on each reflector had been adjusted individually, Jupiter was tracked over a wide range of elevations. See also C.10.

 

Communication from Prof. John Davis, 19 February 2007:

 

‘What the [two larger] pictures show is the perspex graticule we mounted at the focus of a reflector to give us a scale for aligning the images from the individual mirrors into a single “blob” of light - and then for photographing the images of Jupiter to observe what happened when the reflector was tilted in elevation. [One of them] shows the assembly of individual images but I am not sure what the scattered flare of light is - the comment [on the back] regarding “by garage lights” suggests that it is an out-of-focus reflection of lights in the garage where the reflectors were housed - by having them on, the graticule can be seen. In the [smaller] pictures, which show various image assemblies, you can just make out part of the graticule in some but not as clearly.’

 

‘I can’t tell you what the individual image assemblies are except that they were taken during the alignment process using the lamp in a distant gum tree! I went through that alignment process of over 500 mirrors (for the two reflectors) more times than I care to remember as, in use, they gradually became mis-aligned. I accepted responsibility of re-doing it every few months with the aid of students!’

 

‘One telling point regarding the comments is “Red 119 mirrors” which almost certainly means we had taken the faulty mirrors off the reflector at that stage. We mounted all the mirrors on each reflector before removing the protective layer and the alignment tests couldn’t be done with it on. So it looks as if the faulty mirrors were removed a bit sooner than I thought.’

 

The first reflector tests revealed substantial technical problems for which there were no simple solutions.

 

 

 

October 1962

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D.12, D.13

Completed interferometer

 

11 photographs (7 monochrome, 4 colour) and 3 colour transparencies showing the two reflectors and the Narrabri site.

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

1962x1965

D.14, D.15

Control desk and correlator

 

7 monochrome photographs of the control desk and the electronic correlator. Also shown is A. Browne of Mullard Ltd.

 

2 folders.

 

The electronic correlator was produced in the Mullard Research Laboratories in Redhill, Surrey. It arrived in Narrabri in January 1963.

 

n.d.

D.16

Promotion

 

2 monochrome photographs and 1 colour transfer.

 

Photograph 1 shows Hanbury Brown during an interview with P. Pockley, with the reflectors in the background.

 

Photograph 2 shows a wall display that illustrates what the stellar interferometer can do.

 

The transfer displays one of the reflectors and other symbols.

 

Communication from Prof. John Davis, 9 March 2007:

 

‘[The transfer] was done by the town of Narrabri - presumably the local council had something to do with it. It was obviously done to promote the town as it shows the three major farming activities in the region - wheat, sheep and cotton. In the ‘60s the town was very proud of the fact that the Intensity Interferometer had been located locally and that explains the dominant image of a reflector. In the background is a representation of the local mountains - the Nandewar Range whose highest peak is Mount Kaputar (5000 feet).’

 

 

 

n.d.

 

D.17

Miscellaneous

 

2 photographs of Hanbury Brown with one of the reflectors.

 

Photograph 1 (monochrome) was taken in the shed that houses the reflectors; it is inscribed ‘12 March 1966’.

 

Photograph 2 (colour) was taken outdoors in January 1969.

 

 

 

1966, 1969

D.18-D.21

Media coverage

 

 

 

1962-1975

D.18

Newspaper articles

 

7 newspaper articles featuring the NSII.

 

 

 

1962-1975

D.19-D.21

Magazine articles

 

3 folders.

 

 

1964-1971

D.22-D.24

Notebooks

 

 

 

1963-1968

D.22

Exercise book inscribed on front cover ‘Log, Narrabri, March 1963’

 

Used from March 1963 to May 1964.

 

 

 

1963-1964

D.23

Exercise book inscribed on front cover ‘Alpha Lyrae’

 

Used from July to August 1963 to record tests of the instrument on Vega.

 

 

 

1963

D.24

Notebook inscribed on front cover ‘Optical telescopes, Feb 1966, June 1968’

 

 

 

 

1966-1968

D.25-D.38

 

 

SYDNEY UNIVERSITY STELLAR INTERFEROMETER

 

 

 

The Sydney University Stellar Interferometer (SUSI) was the successor of the NSII. It was built in Culgoora near Narrabri.

 

An earlier proposal envisaged a larger and more sensitive intensity interferometer, the VLSII (Very Large Stellar Intensity Interferometer). This plan was abandoned in favour of a Michelson interferometer, which, as Hanbury Brown was keen to emphasize, became J. Davis’s project. The SUSI opened in 1991.

 

 

 

1969-1999

 

D.25-D.27

Plans for a new interferometer

 

 

1969-1974, 1985

D.25

Notes

 

Hanbury Brown’s notes on discussions with J. F. Hosie, F. Hoyle and others re the financing of a future interferometer. Also includes a copy of Hanbury Brown’s and J. Davis’s typewritten notes comparing three types of interferometer.

 

 

 

 

1969, n.d.

D.26

Correspondence

 

Includes invitations for Hanbury Brown to continue his work in Texas, USA.

 

 

 

1970-1972, 1985

D.27

Model, VLSII

 

4 photographs (2 monochrome, 2 colour) of a scale model of an instrument to succeed the NSII. The proposed intensity interferometer featured four coelostats running on straight tracks, with a central building to house the coelostats.

 

Unlike this successor model, the NSII had used two concave reflectors running on a circular track. The proposed new instrument would have been about 80 times more sensitive than the NSII. It was never built.

 

 

 

1974

D.28

Notebook

 

Spiral-bound notepad, used from April 1975.

 

 

 

1975, n.d.

D.29, D.30

Proposal 1977

 

Copy of the bound proposal by the University of Sydney for the construction of ‘A Very High Angular Resolution Stellar Interferometer’, with appendices.

 

2 folders.

 

The proposed instrument outlined here was a Michelson interferometer, not the intensity interferometer planned earlier.

 

 

 

 

D.31, D.32

Planning and promotion

 

Press releases, c.1977-?1980, announcing the decision to produce a feasibility model of a Michelson interferometer. With magazine articles (1981, 1991) outlining the virtue of the planned instrument and its place in the history of interferometry. Includes leaflets and flyers.

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

c.1977-1991

D.33, D.34

International Astronomical Union Symposium

 

Correspondence with J. Davis re the SUSI and a planned symposium on Very High Angular Resolution Imaging, to be held in Sydney, Australia, 11-15 January 1993. Also includes a copy of the final programme with handwritten notes. See also F.172.

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

1992-1993

D.35

Presentation

 

8 transparencies for a presentation on the SUSI, with handwritten notes by ?Hanbury Brown.

 

 

 

c.1993

D.36

Notes

 

Hanbury Brown’s handwritten notes of conversations with J. Davis and their work at the SUSI.

 

J. Davis had invited Hanbury Brown (who had moved to the UK by then) to take part in some observations of Sirius in the spring of 1995 (see H.31, J. M. Bennett).

 

 

 

1994-1995, n.d.

D.37, D.38

Literature

 

Offprints and photocopies of articles about the SUSI and interferometry more generally.

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

 

1990-1999

D.39

ANGLO-AUSTRALIAN TELESCOPE

 

 

 

Includes correspondence with H. A. BrŁck, E. G. Bowen and W. L. Morrison re the projected AAT.

 

H. A. BrŁck was the Regius Professor of Astronomy at the University of Edinburgh and the Astronomer Royal for Scotland. W. L. Morrison was the Minister for Science 1972-1975.

 

 

 

 

1967-1976

D.40-D.42

‘RESEARCH IN THE UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY

 

 

 

Material from a folder so inscribed. Includes a photograph of the meeting inaugurating the Cornell-Sydney University Astronomy Centre. Further contains correspondence re the future of science and engineering in the University of Sydney, Australia, and a handwritten draft of Hanbury Brown’s talk about Physical Science before the Senate of the University in June 1978.

 

3 folders.

 

The establishment meeting of the collaboration between Cornell and Sydney took place at Cornell in September 1964.

 

 

 

 

1964-1978

D.43

PHOTOGRAPH ALBUM

 

 

 

Album documenting the instruments in whose invention and realisation Hanbury Brown was involved over five decades. Includes notes in Hanbury Brown's hand, elucidating the photographs.

 

See also D.4-D.17.

1994 or later

5

 

 

SECTION E

RESEARCH FILES, E.1-E.131

 

 

 

 

Hanbury Brown’s papers contain a substantial portion of research material ranging from the history of radar and the history and philosophy of radio astronomy, to more general reflections on the history of science and its relations with religion.

 

 

1944-2002

E.1-E.38†††††††††† ‘HISTORY OF RADAR’

 

 

E.39-E.97††††††††† RADIO ASTRONOMY

 

 

E.98-E.131††††††† REFLECTIONS ON SCIENCE

 

 

E.1-E.38

‘HISTORY OF RADAR’

 

 

 

Originally 3 box files.

 

 

 

1944-2001

E.1-E.5

Original typescripts

 

 

 

1944-1946

E.1

‘The role of TRE in the invasion of Europe

 

‘Copy No. 3’ of a typescript detailing the contribution of the Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE) to Operation Overlord.

 

 

 

1944

E.2, E.3

‘Mark V UNB/IFF system design’

 

Copy of Hanbury Brown’s account of IFF, dated 9 October 1945.

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

1945

E.4

 

 

 

/…

‘Chronological history of airborne R.D.F. (1936-1941)’

 

Carbon copy of ?Hanbury Brown’s chronology of airborne radar, dated 13 April 1945, with a letter from the Ministry of Supply, dated 13 August 1946.

 

 

 

1945, 1946

 

 

/…

E.5

‘Sir Stafford Cripps, Text of speech on radar’

 

Copy of the speech S. Cripps gave on 14 August 1945. This text was made available through the New York Offices of the British Information Services.

 

 

 

1945

E.6, E.7

Original pamphlets

 

4 pamphlets re war-time radar, with annotations in Hanbury Brown’s hand (dated 9 September 1947) on item 4.

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

1945-1947

E.8

Press clippings

 

12 items, ranging over radar topics such as the claim for the invention of airborne radar brought before the Royal Commission for Awards to Inventors, pioneers such as A. D. Blumlein, and the fate of Bawdsey Manor.

 

 

 

c.1951-1995, n.d.

E.9-E.21

Correspondence

 

 

 

1974-1996

E.9

Beattie

 

Typescript on the origins of radar, by I. Beattie of the Aircraft Preservation Society of Scotland.

 

 

 

1996

E.10, E.11

Bowden

 

2 drafts by B. V. Bowden on the story of IFF. Includes correspondence re the radar pioneer A. F. Wilkins.

2 folders.

 

 

 

1985

E.12-E.14

 

 

 

 

 

Bowen

 

Includes Bowen’s notes and comments after reading S. S. Sword’s Technical History of the Beginnings of Radar and a draft account by Bowen of ‘The beginning of centimetric radar in Great Britain’. Also includes correspondence re W. B. Lewis, and Bowen’s criticisms of a forthcoming American conference in celebration of the 50th anniversary of radar, planned by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, New York, for 1990.

 

3 folders.

 

 

 

1984-1987

 

 

 

 

E.15

Flint, Hayward

 

Correspondence re an account P. Flint was writing on Bentley Priory, which had been occupied by the Royal Air Force, and with F. Hayward re pilots whom Hanbury Brown knew.

 

Flint was a local military history buff. Hayward, a former RAF pilot, was a local military history buff.

 

 

 

1988-1990

E.16, E.17

Institution of Electrical Engineers

 

Correspondence re a conference celebrating the 50th anniversary of radar, to take place 10-12 June 1985 at Savoy Place, London. Includes copies of letters from E. G. Bowen in which he criticises the conception of the programme, and a conference handbook.

 

 

 

1985

E.18

Lovell

 

Contains a portion of A. C. B. Lovell’s Royal Society Biographical Memoir of W. B. Lewis, with correspondence. Also includes correspondence re E. G. Bowen.

 

 

 

1987-1988

E.19

Ratcliffe

 

Letter to J. A. Ratcliffe, detailing Hanbury Brown’s recollections of R. Watson-Watt.

 

1974

E.20

Trim

 

Draft of a history of IFF by R. Trim, with Hanbury Brown’s comments.

 

R. Trim was an engineer who started to develop IFF equipment in the mid-1950s.

 

 

1985-1987

E.21

White

 

Correspondence re I. G. White’s research on the history of Air Intercept (AI).

 

I. G. White was a radar history buff.

 

 

 

1992

E.22-E.32

Memoirs

 

 

Accounts of war memories.

 

 

1974-?1998

E.22

Bowden

 

Draft of B. V. Bowden’s recollections, dated 28 March 1974.

 

 

 

1974

E.23-E.25

Cooke-Yarborough

 

Draft of chapters 6 & 8-13 of E. H. Cooke-Yarborough’s memoirs (1989) and copies of notes given to I. G. White (n.d.).

 

3 folders.

 

 

 

1989, n.d.

E.26-E.28

Hodgkin

 

Draft of A. L. Hodgkin’s memoir, with Hanbury Brown’s commentary and further correspondence.

 

3 folders.

 

 

 

1988

E.29

Jones & Lovell

 

R. V. Jones in the Listener, 31 January 1974.

 

A. C. B. Lovell in New Scientist, 21 October 1982.

 

 

 

1974, 1982

E.30, E.31

Preist

 

Drafts of D. H. Preist’s memories, with correspondence and visual material.

 

2 folders.

1995-?1998

E.32

Whitehead

 

Proof copy of J. R. Whitehead’s Radar to the Future, subsequently retitled Memoirs of a Boffin.

 

 

 

1995

E.33-E.37

Publications

 

Drafts and papers on the history of radar, including chapters from a forthcoming book by R. Buderi and an account of ASV co-authored by Hanbury Brown.

 

5 folders.

 

ASV (Air to Surface Vessel) was developed for airborne detection of ships and surfaced submarines at night or when visibility is bad.

 

 

 

1985-?1995

E.38

Miscellaneous

 

Notes on literature, phone conversations and a pictorial memento of the Radar Memorial unveiling at St Aldhelm’s Head.

 

Includes 3 photographs.

 

 

 

 

c.1981, 1995, 2001

E.39-E.97

RADIO ASTRONOMY

 

 

 

1948-2002

E.39-E.57

Interferometry

 

 

 

1961-1988

E.39-E.47

‘Michelson interferometer’

 

 

1967-1987, n.d.

E.39

 

Correspondence

 

Includes correspondence with R. H. Wilson re the interferometer on Mt. Wilson, USA.

 

R. H. Wilson was the Chief of Applied Mathematics at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in Washington, DC.

1967, 1978

 

E.40

Notes

 

Includes notes by Hanbury Brown on Poisson distributions, taken May 1975.

1975, n.d.

E.41-E.47

Literature

 

Photocopies, offprints and drafts of papers re Michelson interferometry, 1920-1987.

 

7 folders.

 

 

 

1973-1987, n.d.

E.48-E.52

‘Intensity interferometer’

 

 

1961-1988

E.48, E.49

Correspondence

 

Includes correspondence between M. L. Goldberger of the Palmer Physical Laboratory in Princeton, Hanbury Brown and R. Q. Twiss re intensity correlation experiments.

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

1964-1988

E.50

Draft note

 

11-page typescript ‘Can the Narrabri Stellar Interferometer be used to detect gamma-rays from the Crab Nebula?’, by Hanbury Brown.

 

 

 

1967x1968

E.51, E.52

Literature

 

Literature 1955-1974.

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

1961-1974

E.53-E.57

‘Heterodyne & speckle’

 

 

1966-1988

E.53

Correspondence

 

Chiefly correspondence between Hanbury Brown and A. E. H. Labeyrie of the Observatoire de Paris re different types of interferometers and the model likely to succeed the NSII.

 

 

 

1974-1975, 1988

E.54

 

 

 

 

Notes

 

Notes, mostly in Hanbury Brown’s hand, on the signal/noise ratios of interferometers and the infrared spectra of stars.

 

 

 

1970, 1977, n.d.

 

 

E.55-E.57

Literature

 

Offprints and photocopies.

 

3 folders.

 

 

 

1966-1979

E.58-E.60

Quantum theory

 

Offprints and photocopies of drafts and publications 1935-1989.

 

 

 

1979-1989, n.d.

E.61-E.79

‘Photons’

 

 

Material re the Hanbury Brown-Twiss effect and quantum optics more generally.

 

 

1949-2002

E.61-E.68

Correspondence

 

 

 

1957-1999

E.61

 

1957-1959

 

Includes a draft on time correlated photons sent by R. V. Pound to R. Q. Twiss.

 

Also includes a circular letter from R. C. Jones and a draft ‘On the disagreement between Hanbury-Brown and Twiss, and Fellgett and Jones’, dated 1 March 1958, with a further draft on ‘The resolution of the controversy among Hanbury-Brown and Twiss, and Fellgett and Jones’, dated 21 October 1959.

 

Further includes a letter from E. Brannen, dated 22 May 1959, re his and W. Wehlau’s criticism of the Hanbury Brown-Twiss-effect, with a draft of Brannen and Wehlau’s ‘Polarization and resolving time effects in photon correlation’.

 

This material pertains to the controversy created by Hanbury Brown’s and Twiss’s publications on photons in 1956. See also C.7.

 

 

 

 

 

E.62

?1962

 

Contains a copy of portions of L. Lequeux’s thesis draft.

 

L. Lequeux was completing a thesis at the Observatoire de Paris-Meudon.

 

 

 

 

E.63

1964

 

Contains an offprint of a note by L. de Broglie on electromagnetic waves and photons, inscribed by the author, and an original typescript by R. E. B. Makinson re ‘Beats in photoelectric current’, dated 18 November 1964.

 

 

 

 

E.64, E.65

1965

 

Contains a letter from H. Messel, with offprints by L. JŠnossy.

 

2 folders.

 

H. Messel had met the Hungarian physicist L. JŠnossy, who in addition to working on cosmic rays carried out experiments on the interference of light rays.

 

 

 

 

E.66

1974, 1987, 1988

 

Correspondence with L. Mandel of the University of Rochester, New York, B. Robinson of the Division of Radiophysics, CSIRO; and M. C. Teich of the Department of Electrical Engineering, Columbia University.

 

 

 

 

E.67, E.68

1999

 

Correspondence and published material re quantum optics.

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

 

E.69-E.73

Draft papers

 

Drafts of papers on quantum optics, sent to Hanbury Brown prior to publication.

 

1956-1990

E.69

1956-1961

 

Copies of typescripts by E. M. Purcell, E. Wolf and U. Fano.

 

 

 

 

E.70

1963-1965

 

Copies of typescripts by R. J. Glauber and E. Wolf.

 

 

 

 

E.71, E.72

1968

 

Copy of typescript by V. Ernst and P. Stehle.

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

 

E.73

1990

 

Copy of typescript by G. Goldhaber.

 

 

 

 

E.74-E.79

Offprints and photocopies

 

6 folders, covering literature 1946-2002.

 

 

 

1949-2002, n.d.

E.80, E.81

Sirius

 

Literature (1926-1995) on Sirius, a celestial object that occupied a special place in Hanbury Brown’s attentions (see C.7, H.31).

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

1968-1995, n.d.

E.82-E.97

‘Historical papers on radio astronomy’

 

 

 

1948-1994

E.82-E.84

Correspondence

 

 

1985-1990

E.82

Lovell

 

Correspondence (with appended material) re the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT).

 

1985

E.83, E.84

Sullivan

 

Correspondence with W. T. Sullivan re his book, History of Radio Astronomy; includes drafts of Sullivan’s work and copies of letters Hanbury Brown sent to M. Ryle in 1949.

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

1989-1990

E.85-E.88

Draft papers

 

Includes typescripts by J. G. Bolton (1960) and M. Ryle on radio source work 1960-1963 (1963). Also includes an essay on Jodrell Bank by A. C. B. Lovell (c.1982) and material on the AAT from E. G. Bowen (1966, 1985).

 

4 folders.

 

 

 

1960-1985

E.89-E.96

Literature

 

Chiefly offprints.

 

8 folders.

 

 

 

1948-1989

E.97

Obituaries

 

Obituaries of H. Palmer, J. Oort and J. G. Bolton.

 

 

 

 

1990-1994

E.98-E.131

REFLECTIONS ON SCIENCE

 

 

 

1960-2001, n.d.

E.98-E.109

Notes on the history of science

 

 

 

n.d.

E.98-E.101

‘Notes’

 

Material from a ringbinder, containing Hanbury Brown’s notes on history and philosophy of science literature mainly 1939-1976.

 

4 folders.

 

 

n.d.

E.102-E.108

‘Lecture notes’

 

Material from a ringbinder, containing Hanbury Brown’s notes on history and philosophy of science (and technology) literature mainly from 1923-1995.

 

 

n.d.

E.102

Amsterdam-Butterfield

 

 

 

 

E.103

Caldin-Fishlock

 

 

 

 

E.104

Gillispie-Huxley

 

 

 

 

E.105

Jammer-Murray

 

 

 

 

E.106

Norman-Polanyi

 

 

 

 

E.107

Randall-Singer

 

 

 

 

E.108

Technology-Zukav

 

 

 

 

E.109

Miscellaneous notes

 

Notes on literature ranging from texts by J. Huxley and C. Sagan to material on Hanbury Brown’s grandfather.

 

Hanbury Brown’s grandfather, Sir Robert Hanbury Brown, was an irrigation engineer in Egypt. He was involved in the building of the Aswan reservoir.

 

 

 

n.d.

E.110-E.122

Science and religion

 

 

1963-2001, n.d.

E.110-E.114

Correspondence

 

 

1970-2001, n.d.

E.110-E.113

 

 

 

Birch

 

Correspondence with C. Birch, with appended material.

 

4 folders.

 

The renowned ecologist C. Birch was a professor at the University of Sydney.

 

 

 

1970-?1984, n.d.

 

E.114

Miscellaneous

 

Correspondence, with appended material.

 

 

 

1980-2001, n.d.

E.115

Notes

 

Notes and jottings in Hanbury Brown’s hand.

 

 

 

n.d.

E.116-E.122

Literature

 

 

1963-1999, n.d.

E.116

Typescripts

 

Includes copies of papers by T. Roszak and F. J. Dyson.

 

 

 

1971, 1986, n.d.

E.117-E.120

Press cuttings

 

4 folders.

 

 

 

1972-1996, n.d.

E.121, E.122

Offprints and photocopies

 

In alphabetical order. Includes a copy of ‘Objections to astrology: A statement by 186 leading scientists’ (1975).

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

1963-1999, n.d.

E.123-E.131

‘Science, general articles’

 

 

 

1960-1992, n.d.

E.123-E.130

General

 

 

1960-1992, n.d.

E.123

Correspondence

 

Contains a letter from D. M. Armstrong, with an offprint on ‘The nature of mind’.

 

1967

E.124

Notes

 

Notes and jottings in Hanbury Brown’s hand.

 

 

 

n.d.

E.125-E.130

Literature

 

 

1960-1992, n.d.

E.125-E.127

Press cuttings and magazine articles

 

In chronological order.

 

3 folders.

 

 

 

1960-1984

E.128-E.130

Offprints and photocopies

 

In alphabetical order. Includes material on the public understanding of science and the definition of fundamental research.

 

3 folders.

 

 

 

1965-1992, n.d.

E.131

Cosmology

 

Photocopies of articles on cosmology, including a paper on Maya astronomy.

 

 

 

1966-1974

 

5

 

 

SECTION F

PUBLICATIONS, LECTURES AND BROADCASTS, F.1-F.217

 

 

 

1935, 1936, 1950-2003

F.1-F.78††††††††††† PUBLICATIONS

 

F.79-F.217††††††† LECTURES AND BROADCASTS

 

 

F.1-F.78

PUBLICATIONS

 

 

 

1935, 1936, 1950-2003, n.d.

F.1-F.68

Drafts

 

 

 

1936, 1964-2003

F.1

‘The third time’

 

Typescript submitted to the Cambridge Literary Agency for a £10 Prize Story Competition; unpublished.

 

 

 

1936

F.2

‘The stellar interferometer at Narrabri Observatory’, Sky and Telescope vol. 28 (August 1964), 64-69

 

Copy of original article and 3 original illustrations.

 

 

 

1964

F.3

‘Summary delivered on Friday 18 December’, in Proceedings of the Second Texas Symposium on Relativistic Astrophysics, December 15-19, 1964, ed. J. N. Douglas et al. (New York, 1969), 165

 

Original typescript, with a covering letter to E. L. Schucking.

 

 

 

1965

F.4-F.6

The Intensity Interferometer. Its Application to Astronomy (London, 1974)

 

 

1971-1977, n.d.

F.4

Copy of the book

 

 

 

1974

F.5

Correspondence

 

Chiefly correspondence with Taylor & Francis, the publisher. Includes a royalty statement.

1971-1975

F.6

Reviews

 

 

 

1975-1977, n.d.

F.7

‘The story of how and why the stellar intensity interferometer at Narrabri came to be built’

 

Typescript account intended for publication in Chance and Design in Science, Invention, Technology, ed. A. J. Birch; unpublished. Includes correspondence and 2 additional typescripts, ‘Michelson’s stellar interferometer’ and ‘Untitled’.

 

 

 

1976

F.8, F.9

Man and the Stars (Oxford, 1978)

 

 

1978-1981

F.8

Copy of the book

 

 

 

1978

F.9

Correspondence and reviews

 

 

 

1979-1981

F.10

‘The nature of science’, Zygon vol. 14 (September 1979), 201-215

 

Copy of the original article and copy of the original typescript, circulated at the World Council of Churches’s Conference on Faith, Science, and the Future, 12-24 July 1979, Cambridge, Mass., USA.

 

See also J.5, J.7.

 

 

 

1979

F.11

‘A review of the achievements and potential of intensity interferometry’, in High Angular Resolution Stellar Interferometry, ed. J. Davis and W. J. Tango (Sydney, 1979)

 

Copy of typescript. See also F.123.

 

 

 

1979

F.12

‘Modernizing Michelson’s stellar interferometer’, in Los Alamos Conference on Optics 1981. SPIE Proceedings 288, ed. D. H. Liebenberg et al. (Bellingham, 1979), 545-550

 

Copy of the original typescript.

 

 

1980

F.13

‘Paraboloids, galaxies and stars: memories of Jodrell Bank’, in Early Years of Radio Astronomy – Reflections Fifty Years after Jansky’s Discovery, ed. W. T. Sullivan III (Cambridge, 1984), 213-235

 

Copy of the original chapter and 5 original illustrations, with a letter from W. T. Sullivan III.

 

 

 

1984

F.14

‘Why bother about science?’, Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales vol. 118 (1985), 43-46

 

Copy of the original typescript of Hanbury Brown’s address at the annual dinner of the Royal Society of New South Wales, Australia. Includes a programme for the evening.

 

See also F.148, J.10.

 

 

 

1985

F.15, F.16

Photons, Galaxies and Stars (Bangalore, 1985)

 

 

1985-1987

F.15

Copy of the book

 

 

 

1985

F.16

Reviews

 

 

 

1986-1987

F.17

‘Foreword’, in Halley. The Once-in-a-Lifetime Comet, by C. and D. Allen (Sydney, 1985)

 

Copy of the original typescript.

 

 

 

n.d.

F.18

‘Science and culture’, in Science and Society in Australia (Canberra, 1986), 4-11

 

Typescript dated 23 March 1986. Text of an address delivered at a symposium of the Australian Academy of Science, Canberra, Australia, on 2 May 1986.

 

See also J.12.

 

 

 

1986

F.19-F.33

The Wisdom of Science (Cambridge, 1986)

 

 

1986-2002, n.d.

F.19

Copy of the book

 

 

 

1986

F.20-F.22

Correspondence re publication

 

3 folders.

 

 

 

1980-2002

F.23

‘Notes for book’

 

Handwritten notes.

 

 

 

n.d.

F.24-F.26

Images

 

3 folders.

 

 

 

mid-1980s

F.27-F.30

Reviews

 

 

1987-1990

F.27

Scientist

 

Correspondence re a dismissive review of the book. Includes Hanbury Brown’s published defence.

 

 

 

1987

F.28

Observatory

 

Correspondence re a dismissive review of the book. Includes Hanbury Brown’s published defence.

 

 

 

1987-1988

F.29, F.30

Other reviews

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

1987-1990

F.31, F.32

Correspondence arising

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

1986-1993

F.33

Accounts

 

Includes of list of persons who received complimentary copies of the book.

1986-1987

F.34, F.35

Cosmic Perspectives (Cambridge, 1989)

 

 

1986-1989

F.34

Copy of the book

 

 

 

1989

F.35

Correspondence

 

 

 

1986-1988

F.36-F.44

Boffin (Adam Hilger, 1991)

 

 

1989-2003, n.d.

F.36

Copy of the book

 

 

 

1991

F.37-F.39

Correspondence re publication

 

Includes Hanbury Brown’s reviews of other manuscripts for Adam Hilger.

 

3 folders.

 

 

 

1989-1995

F.40

Spiral bound notebook

 

Inscribed ‘Marion Brown, rewritten experiments-results’. Contains Hanbury Brown’s notes for Boffin.

 

 

 

n.d.

F.41

Notes on book

 

 

 

November 1989

F.42

Illustrations

 

Images used in the book.

 

 

 

n.d.

F.43

Reviews and correspondence arising

 

Includes a list of ‘copies of book given to’ and a letter to R. V. Jones. Further includes correspondence from the publishers to Hanbury Brown’s widow, announcing that Boffin will be reprinted.

 

 

 

1991-1995, 2002

F.44

Royalty statements

 

1991-2003

F.45-F.47

‘Robert Alexander Watson-Watt, the father of radar’, Engineering Science and Education Journal vol. 3 (February 1994), 31-40

 

 

1989-1994

F.45

Copy of the original journal issue.

 

 

 

1994

F.46

Correspondence re publication

 

 

 

1992-1994

F.47

Research material

 

Notes and copies of articles.

 

 

 

1989-1992, n.d.

F.48-F.50

‘Bose statistics and the stars’, Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy vol. 15 (March 1994), 39-45

 

 

1993-1994

F.48

Copy of the journal issue

 

 

 

1994

F.49, F.50

Drafts

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

1993-1994

F.51, F.52

‘Photons, waves and stars’, in Measuring the Size of Things in the Universe, ed. S. Costa et al. (World Scientific, 1999)

 

 

1998-1999

F.51

Copy of the book

 

 

 

1999

F.52

Draft and correspondence

 

 

 

1998-1999

F.53-F.68

There are no Dinosaurs in the Bible (Penton Mewsey, 2002)

 

See also J.96-J.103.

 

 

1998-2002

F.53

Copy of the book

 

 

2002

F.54

Correspondence re publication

 

Includes correspondence with F. J. Dyson, the winner of the Templeton Prize in 2000, and letters to publishers. Also includes lists of publishers contacted.

 

 

 

2000-2001

F.55, F.56

Notes for the book

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

n.d.

F.57-F.66

Drafts

 

10 folders.

 

 

 

n.d., 1999-2001

F.67, F.68

Literature

 

Includes press cuttings and handwritten notes on literature. Further includes 3 exercise books with notes on literature.

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

1998 and n.d.

F.69-F.72

Reviews and newspaper articles

 

 

 

1965-2000

F.69, F.70

Book reviews

 

Includes correspondence.

 

2 folders.

 

 

 

1965-2000

F.71

Newspaper articles

 

6 newspaper articles.

 

 

 

1973, 1975

F.72

Letter to the Independent

 

Hanbury Brown reacted to a column by W. Rees-Mogg.

 

 

 

 

July-August 1991

F.73-F.75

Offprints and books

 

 

3 boxes.

 

F.75 contains books.

 

 

 

1935, 1950-1994

F.76-F.78

Miscellaneous illustrations

 

 

Drawings, photographs and photocopies.

 

3 folders.

 

 

 

 

n.d.

F.79-F.217

LECTURES AND BROADCASTS

 

 

 

1951-1998, n.d.

F.79-F.191

Lectures

 

 

 

1951-1998, n.d.

F.79

Account of work at the Jodrell Bank Experimental Station, Ordinary General Meeting of the British Astronomical Association on 30 May 1951, Journal of the British Astronomical Association vol. 61 (July 1951), 180-184

 

Copy of the original publication.

 

 

 

1951

F.80

Address given at the degree ceremony, University of Sydney, Australia, 27 April 1961, The Union Recorder vol. 44 (2 July 1964), 126-127

 

Copy of the original publication.

 

 

 

1964

F.81

‘The stellar interferometer at Narrabri’, conference on interference, CSIRO, Australia, ?25 August 1964

 

Typescript.

 

 

 

1964

F.82-F.109

‘Lecture notes to 1974’

 

Contents of a series of files so inscribed.

 

1966-1974, n.d.

F.82

 

Untitled talk, University of New South Wales, Australia, 31 May 1966

 

Handwritten draft.

 

 

 

1966

F.83

Untitled talk, University of Rochester, USA, June 1966

 

Handwritten draft.

 

 

 

1966